Protecting Their Turf

Molly Soat
Marketing News
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Key Takeaways
  • Ensighten’s clients can use the company’s technology to organize and protect the data that they gather through their other technology vendors, such as their e-mail marketing platforms and analytics tools. 
  • Ensighten’s software doesn’t deal with malware, specifically, but rather protects customer data from peeping third-party vendors by managing browsers’ cookies, which track consumers’ movements and data entries online. 
  • "Historically, these conversations were driven within corporations within their legal and privacy compliance teams. ... What we’re seeing now, though, is that it’s marketing raising their hands because marketing is stuck in the middle."
​With data protection t​op of mind for many companies these days, one marketer offers his perspective on what it takes to position privacy software to win in a tech category brimming with old stalwarts and new entrants

The Home Depot’s data breach—one of the most recent in a string of digital information thefts at large retail outlets—resulted in 56 million customers’ credit and debit card information falling into hackers’ hands. The home improvement retailer’s experience is yet another example of the perils of doing business in the digital age.

While it presents a formidable challenge to many brands’ success, the increasingly precarious position of customer data in the digital realm has reinforced a burgeoning market category: corporate security software.  The financial data theft at The Home Depot represents just one type of digital invasion—a malware infection at point-of-sale card readers—but it has reaffirmed the need for protection of financial and personal infor​mation across every customer touch point.

According to Gartner, the information security market grew 5% last year, with vendor revenues reaching $19.9 billion. The three category leaders—Symantec, McAfee and Trend Micro, which rank Nos. 1, 2 and 3, respectively, according to Gartner—combined hold a 35% market share. However, the market is large enough that smaller players still are managing to attract Fortune 1,000 clients.

Ensighten, for example, a San Jose, Calif.-based company that was founded in 2009 as a tag-management software provider, now offers “Ensighten Privacy” software to clients including Wal-Mart, United Airlines, Microsoft, Capital One, E-Trade and T-Mobile. Ensighten’s privacy-management software suites manage outside websites’ ability to track a site’s visitors, and also organize the data that marketing teams glean from tracking their customers online—and keep that information safe from theft. Ensighten’s software doesn’t deal with malware, specifically, but rather protects customer data from peeping third-party vendors by managing browsers’ cookies, which track consumers’ movements and data entries online. 

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Author Bio:

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Molly Soat
Molly Soat is a staff writer for Marketing News and Marketing News Exclusives. E-mail her at msoat@ama.org.

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