The AMA Gold Report: 2016 Top 25 Global Market Research Firms

Michael Brereton & Diane Bowers
American Marketing Association
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Key Takeaways

What? The market research industry is on the cusp of a great coalescence of disciplines and specialties.

So what? Though subcategories of market research may feel disparate, their customers are expecting a unified presentation of their services.

Now what? Like the leaders in the market research industry, you should merge talents within your firm and continue to innovate to move your field forward.

October 2016

The marketing research industry as we’ve known it for decades is disappearing. It is on the cusp of a great “coming together”—a grand fusion of intelligence-provider subsegments to deliver solutions  demanded by clients in the era of Big Data.

The offerings developed by research providers, and the business models created to deliver them, will continue to be driven by clients’ evolving needs for market intelligence. The disruptive effects of technology-enabled solutions to leverage the Big Data phenomenon have substantially altered those expectations. This fact was recently supported in a document released by Cambiar, the Boston Consulting Group and the Yale School of Management. In the report, “Trends Shaping The Future Of Market Research – A Client Perspective,” clients foresee shifting greater time and resources to the concentration on data analytics/ mining and integration of multiple data streams while less emphasis is placed on traditional areas of focus such as ad tracking, brand tracking and brand awareness and usage. This will perpetuate an environment in which the function of survey research continues to be absorbed into a rapidly transforming collection of market intelligence subdisciplines. It will also perpetuate the attraction of players not previously considered partners or competitors in the traditional marketing research space.

As existing providers in this morphing space, how do we respond to remain viable in the eyes of our clients? Much has been written about the need for transformation and corresponding best practices in terms of broad business principles. But how does the provider community retool with specific capabilities to meet this evolving demand?

The marketing research industry has always been adroit at adopting new disciplines, such as web data collection, real-time delivery of data and video focus groups. This individual company enhancement evolution continues. Indeed, every month we read about providers developing and launching new capabilities to broaden their market offerings. But the transformative speed, capital requirements and technology applications required to compete with forces from outside our traditional boundaries can make homegrown organic responses insufficient.

Consequently, there are increasing signs of convergence— inorganic plays to assemble various disciplines required for integrative solutions. Often the players are from beyond our traditional space, such as Salesforce’s recent acquisitions of Implicit (predictive analytics), MinHash (social media aggregation) and Evariant (enterprise feedback management). Additionally, on the Salesforce Marketing Cloud Platform, customers are now invited to assemble and launch combined data collection, analysis and visualization tools. There are already 69 survey app components available to choose from, including recognizable sources such as Qualtrics, Walker, Medallia and IMS Health.

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The Industry Response: Developing an Understanding

As the pace of demand and competitive response evolves so dramatically, what are the implications for individual players in the market? Is it inevitable that each of us must consider participating in some grand fusion of complementary capabilities to survive? For the purposes of this article, we assume that, yes, an inorganic convergence, rather than organic development of new capabilities, will be required to meet the speed and intensity of demand. 

If we are going to acquire or rent other companies of complementary expertise within the broadened market intelligence space, the resulting challenge is to identify those players to create a successful strategic and cultural fusion. How does the leadership in each of these various emerging subsegments view their discipline’s role within the evolving market? Do they similarly see the need for a convergence with survey research? Is this issue even on their radar?

Relatively little data to help understand such dynamics exists today. The AMA (formerly Honomichl) U.S. Top 50 Report and Global Top 25 Report have long been the industry standards for annually documenting patterns in the global business of marketing research, and the major players driving its growth. This will continue. But just as the market is transforming, so too will these reports. Yes, we will continue to track and publish annual changes in the traditional survey research market, but beginning this year, we will also explore the broader marketing intelligence space in which we reside. This year the reports take a first step to understand the expanding field of players in the emerging subsegments that define this morphing space. It is the intent that in subsequent years these reports will expand to include the listings and detailed information for evolving subsegments.

In coordination with CASRO and Michigan State University, AMA introduces a comprehensive look at the broadened market intelligence space within which we contribute and compete. The Broad School of Business atcommitted to developing the next generation of marketing leadership through internship-based master of marketing research programs. As part of the Michigan State University Research Transformed Collaborative, seven studies have now been completed on the marketing research transformation topic. These studies were conducted among leaders of the various subsegments in the expanding space. Each subsegment study strives to understand the corresponding leadership strategic perspective. The detailed study results are available separately; this article offers a brief summary of findings.

This research and interpretation has been completed by students within the Michigan State University master of science in marketing research program. The result is a fact-based perspective by our industry’s future leaders, those charged with the long-term impact of transformation and fusion and those most directly affected by it.

The Beginnings of a Grand Fusion Roadmap

The marketing research industry is being absorbed into a rapidly transforming collection of market intelligence subdisciplines. Each of us might define differently the list of those various disciplines. But today’s conference agendas, industry journals and merger and acquisition activity indicate a pattern of subsegments forming. Many of these have been addressed in this research, but this article will briefly touch on the interactions between only four of them:

1. Predictive analytics.
2. Social media.
3. Data visualization.
4. Enterprise feedback management.

Many full-service market research firms position themselves as incorporating most or all of these subsegment disciplines. For the purpose of this research, however, the students focused only on companies indicating each of these disciplines as their primary area of focus. The result is a glimpse of the mindset of the leadership in these subsegment companies as they consider their role within a fusion.

1. Predictive Analytics

A successful convergence is likely to start with the predictive analytics discipline. Nearly two-thirds of all leaders surveyed believe predictive analytics will experience the greatest growth, as a discipline within market intelligence, during the next five years. While often characterized as a supporting function, predictive analytics was nevertheless identified as having the greatest impact on future transformation of the industry and its players.

Valerie Schroder is a recent graduate of the Michigan State master of science in marketing research program and has been hired as associate manager of consumer insights at the Wendy’s Company. Schroder observes, “Predictive analytics, data science and machine learning are becoming more mainstream for companies trying to improve their ability to find insights in customer behavior. It’s complementary, an obvious extension of the business.”

But from a cultural integration perspective, the fusion of survey research and pure-play predictive analytics disciplines will require caution. Predictive analytics leadership tends to not view themselves as part of the marketing research industry. They perceive themselves as disruptors of the future rather than disruptors of the past and foresee a greater amount of change in the industry moving forward, compared to what we have experienced during the past two years.

2. Data Visualization

The data visualization discipline shares many of the same characteristics as predictive analytics in terms of company leadership’s perceptions of their role in shaping the industry of tomorrow. Leaders across the industry see data visualization capabilities playing a dominant role in the future.

Monica Lee, another recent graduate, has been hired as analyst of survey insights at comScore Inc. Lee observes, “The ability to effectively ‘tell a story’ with research findings was the No. 1 skill set identified as required by future leaders to address the emerging challenges of our industry. So it’s no coincidence that data visualization is considered to be a discipline likely to realize greatest growth during the next five years, second only to predictive analytics.”

Similar to predictive analytics, data visualization leaders tend to not view themselves as part of the marketing research industry, but rather see themselves playing an outsized role in disrupting the future of market intelligence. Overall, data visualization firms leave the impression that they have not felt particular angst in their business with the level of change experienced in the industry to date, but they expect to directly contribute to increasing levels of disruption moving forward.

3. Enterprise Feedback Management

That perspective is in contrast with those aligned to the enterprise feedback management (EFM) discipline. EFM platforms are most often associated with customer experience management and fast feedback processes. EFM companies are more likely to view themselves as part of the same industry as marketing research, although they prefer being aligned to the terms “insight” and “feedback” rather than “research.”

Gavin Sanders, a graduate of the Michigan State program who is working as ProCare specialist for Stryker Inc., observes, “EFM represents a gray area in the research space. It can certainly play a powerful role in research operations. Advances in technology and automation, along with EFM’s ease-of-use, are increasing the capabilities and appeal of EFM platforms. As this segment continues to evolve, we think EFM systems will increasingly compete directly with the survey research industry for market share.”

Unlike predictive analytics and data visualization, EFM leadership looks back to massive levels of change already experienced in our space and the disruptive roles they played in contributing to it. But looking forward, however, they see a lesser role in driving that change. From a fusion of survey research perspective, and related strategic and cultural integration, it’s important to note that the EFM leadership maintains a perspective that substantial industry change is now subsiding.

4. Social Media

Similar to EFM (and unlike predictive analytics and data visualization), social media leadership leaves the impression that the height of their disruptive effect on the industry has passed. This may be a reflection of the fact that user-generated content from numerous social media platforms is now accepted by most as a supplemental source after initial resistance by many.

Joey Stephenson, account specialist in client development for The NPD Group and a graduate of the Michigan State program, observes, “Social media analytics has undergone a sweeping paradigm shift from its humble beginnings nearly a decade ago. This subsegment is no longer exclusive to aggregation but has taken an active approach by forging actionable insights with the unsolicited data it collects. This trend will only become more aggressive and methodologically innovative as time goes on.”

In terms of implications for integration with the traditional survey research discipline, social media leadership tends to agree that massive change in the industry has occurred but will be more tempered moving forward. They are not as likely as most to agree that the industry is rapidly transforming. They are also more comfortable than most other subsegments to position themselves as part of the same industry as marketing research.

The Role of Survey Research Can Thrive

While the magnitude of change facing our industry may be debated, market indications leave little doubt that industry transformation is underway. The response by many is likely to be something more aggressive than traditional organic solutions; a shift to consider participating in some grand fusion of complementary capabilities is likely to occur. Such an effort in converging will help sustain the critical role of professional research within the rapidly evolving market intelligence space.

This brief summary offers a snapshot of the inconsistent environment into which such a voyage enters. In time, the delineation of the emerging subsegments in this expanding market intelligence space will be more clear, and the players in each and their motivations will be better understood. The AMA looks forward to contributing to that understanding as our industry discovery process and reporting evolves with the market.

—Michael Brereton


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The 2015 growth rate was flat for the 25 research companies included in this year’s AMA Gold Global Top 25 Report. The total 2015 revenue for the Global Top 25, reported in U.S. dollars, was $22.5 billion versus $22.7 billion in 2014, -0.9% (or -0.2% when adjusted for inflation).

The currency exchange rate fluctuation between 2014 and 2015, generally, had a negative effect on the growth rate in 2015, particularly since the U.S. dollar gained some value against the euro and the yen. In fact, viewing the annual revenue in home country currency, rather than U.S. dollars, changes the growth picture dramatically. The Global Top 25 companies headquartered in France, Germany and Japan all reported strong growth in their home country currency (euros and yen) in 2015 over 2014. 


A more positive indication of industry growth in 2015 was the 2% increase in employment among the Global Top 25. The number of full-time research professionals (this does not include administrative staff, interviewers or subcontractors) employed in 2015 by the Global Top 25 companies around the world was 135,352—an increase of 2,700 professionals.

The globalization and boundary breaking of the industry continues, particularly among the Global Top 25. The average number of countries in which a Global Top 25 company has an office or a subsidiary is 27 countries. These numbers include more outreach to and establishment of offices in emerging research markets in Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia and South and Central America.

More than one-half of the revenue from the Global Top 25 companies is derived from outside their home countries. The Global Top 25 are headquartered in six major countries, but many Global Top 25 companies have multiple headquarters in locations other than their home country.

Global Revenue and Growth Rate

The Global Top 25 companies submit their annual revenue in their home country currency. These figures are converted to U.S. dollars based on the year’s average currency exchange rates provided by the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank. In 2015 the currency exchange rate for the U.S. dollar had an especially negative effect on the euro and on the yen. Looking at 2015 revenue from the home country currency perspective, the European and Japanese Global Top 25 companies had growth rates ranging from 2.2% to 6.9%.

While we know that the currency exchange rate affected the growth rate for these companies, there was still a downturn in the overall growth rate year over year. Not as many companies experienced significant growth in 2015, and there were more companies that experienced either flat growth or a decline in growth. The chart below compares the revenue and growth rate in 2014 and 2015.

Composition of the Global Top 25

Twenty-three of the 25 companies included in last year’s Global Top 25 are included in this year’s list. Not included in the 2016 Global Top 25 Report are IBOPE Group from Brazil (No. 15 on last year’s AMA Gold Global Top 50 Report) and BVA from France (No. 22 on last year’s AMA Global Top 50 Report).

The media measurement sector of IBOPE Group was acquired by Kantar in December 2014 to form Kantar IBOPE Media.

IN VIVO BVA, the consumer department of BVA in France, merged with the U.S. research company Perception Research Services (No. 32 on last year’s AMA Gold Global Top 50 Report) to form PRS IN VIVO in January 2016, which was No. 26 on the 2016 AMA Gold Top 50 Report for the U.S. research industry, published in the June issue this year of Marketing News.

The two new companies that are now featured in the 2016 Global Top 25 Report are Rentrak (No. 23), a U.S. research firm specializing in media and social media measurement headquartered in Portland, Oregon; and Cello Health (No. 25), a British research company, specializing in health care, pharmaceutical and consumer strategic marketing, headquartered in London.

The upward and downward movement in the Global Top 25 list was not particularly turbulent in 2015. In addition to the new arrivals there were just a couple of big jumps:

  • YouGov, a media, brand, and custom research specialist headquartered in London and last year’s No. 24, moved up four positions to No. 20;
  • Los Angeles-based custom research, social media, and data analytics company Lieberman Research Worldwide at No. 25 on last year’s list, moved up three positions to No. 22.

These big jumps up the Global Top 25 ladder are clear indicators of growth. Adding to this growth disposition, three companies moved up one position on the list:

  • ICF International, a U.S. research company serving governments and multinational organizations with research and technical training, moved from No. 16 to No. 15.
  • Video Research, a media and marketing research firm serving the Japanese media, TV and radio market, moved from No. 17 to No. 16.
  • Abt SRBI, a U.S. research firm specializing in the fields of health, social, environmental and international policy, moved from No. 20 to No. 19.

There were only a few companies that moved down the list. French multimedia audience and advertising measurement company Médiamétrie, No. 23 on last year’s list, moved down one position to No. 24.

Finally, there were two instances of “switching seats”—one company moving up one category and the other company moving down:

  • Dunnhumby, a London-based retail, manufacturer and grocery customer science measurement company, moved up one position to No. 7 on the list while Westat, specializing in U.S. government, nonprofit, social institutions and education research, moved from No. 7 down to No. 8.
  • ComScore, a U.S. crossplatform research company that measures audiences, brands and consumer behavior moved up to No. 10 from No. 11, and Wood MacKenzie, an Edinburgh, U.K.-based research and commercial intelligence firm specializing in energy, metals and mining industries moved from No. 10 down to No. 11 on the Global Top 25.

Maintaining their positions on the Global Top 25 list are:

  • At No. 18, MaritzCX, a customer experience software and research company formed through a merger of Allegiance Software and Maritz Research, headquartered in Lehi, Utah.
  • At No. 14, J.D. Power, a California-based global marketing services company specializing in customer satisfaction and product quality measurement.
  • At No. 13, Macromill, a Japanese marketing research and online panel company that merged with MetrixLab, a market and consumer insights company headquartered in the Netherlands.
  • At No. 12, the NPD Group, a global information and business solutions company specializing in industry, consumer and entertainment tracking services.
  • At No. 9, INTAGE Holdings, a Tokyo-based company specializing in standardized syndicated data and customized research services.
  • At No. 6, IRI, a Chicago-based global research, data and predictive analytics company providing consumer, retail and media tracking and measurement services.

The Top Five

Consistently topping the chart are the five largest research companies in the world. Nielsen, Kantar, IMS Health, Ipsos and GfK together represent 76% of the total Global Top 25 revenue for 2015.

At No. 1, Nielsen’s 2015 revenue of more than $6.2 billion represents 30% of the Global Top 25 revenue.

Of the top five companies, only IMS Health increased its revenue in 2015, with a strong 10.6% growth rate. As stated above, the growth rate for Ipsos and GfK was negatively impacted by the currency exchange rate. The top two companies, Nielsen and Kantar, experienced modest declines in their revenue in 2015—when adjusted for inflation, their growth rate was flat.

The top five have operations around the world: GfK has offices in 74 countries, Ipsos is present in 87 countries, and Nielsen, Kantar and IMS Health have offices in 100 or more countries.

Together, the top five employ almost 111,000 research professionals—82% of the total employees among the Global Top 25 companies.

All of the top five companies derive more than 60% of their annual revenue from countries outside of their corporate headquarters.

  1. Nielsen Holdings N.V. is headquartered in the Netherlands, but most of its $6.2 billion in annual revenue comes from the other 105 countries in which it has offices.
  2. Ipsos SA is headquartered in France, but 93% of its annual revenue comes from its 87 offices in other countries.
  3. Kantar, the data investment management division of WPP, is headquartered in the U.K., but nearly 80% of its revenue comes from outside the U.K.
  4. GfK SE is headquartered in Germany, but 75% of its revenue comes from outside its home country.
  5. IMS Health, headquartered in the U.S., receives more than 61% of its annual revenue from other countries.

Portfolio of Services

The Global Top 25 is dominated by companies that provide syndicated, tracking and measurement services, which continue to be the steady drivers of growth. Twelve companies on the list specialize in measurement and tracking services: Nielsen, IMS Health, IRI, dunnhumby, comScore, Wood MacKenzie, NPD, J.D. Power, Video Research, YouGov, Rentrak and Médiamétrie. These 12 companies represent 57.3% of the total 2015 revenue for the Global Top 25. In addition, most of the other Global Top 25 companies also include measurement and tracking in their portfolio of services.

Reading through the profiles of the Global Top 25 companies confirms that their services are expanding and changing. Most companies are vested in online research, panel research, social media measurement and data analytics. The transformation of the research industry is well underway. The Global Top 25 companies are increasing their focus on and investment in social media, predictive analytics, data visualization and enterprise feedback management, among other emerging subdisciplines.

Read through the company profiles to see how these leading-edge companies are transforming their portfolios.

—Diane Bowers

The Top 25 Company Profiles 

 1. Nielsen

CEO: Dwight M. Barns, B.S., Miami University
Founded: 1923 Research
Only
Employees:
43,000
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $3.6B
2015 Global Revenue: $6.2B % Change from 2014: -1.8%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country $2.6B
% Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 41.6%

2. Kantar*

Chariman & CEO: Eric Salama, M.S., University of London
Founded: 1993 Research Only Employees: 23,000
Parent Country: UK 2015 Home Country Revenue: $754M
2015 Global Revenue: $3.7B % Change from 2014: -2.0%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $2.9B % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 79.7%


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimation by the report authors.

3. IMS Health Inc.

CEO: Ari Bousbib, M.B.A., Columbia University
Founded: 1954 Research Only Employees: 15,000
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $1.1B
2015 Global Revenue: $2.9B
% Change from 2014: +10.6%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $1.8B
% Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 61.4%

4. Ipsos SA***

President & CEO: Didier Truchot, Economics, Pantheon-Sorbonne University
Chairman: Pierre LeManh, M.B.A., Essec Business School
Founded: 1975 Research Only Employees: 16,450
Parent Country: France 2015 Home Country Revenue: $136M
2015 Global Revenue: $2B % Change from 2014: -10.8%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $1.8B % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 93.1%


*** 2015 currency exchange rate from euros to U.S. dollars decreased percent growth rate

GfK SE***

CEO: Matthias Hartmann, B.A., University of Cooperative Education, Stuttgart, German
Founded: 1934 Research Only Employees: 13,485
Parent Country: Germany 2015 Home Country Revenue: $424M
2015 Global Revenue: $1.7B % Change from 2014: -11.4%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $1.3B % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 75.3%


*** 2015 currency exchange rate from euros to U.S. dollars decreased percent growth rate

6. IRI

President & CEO: Andrew Appel, M.B.A., University of Chicago
Chairman: Richard H. Lenny, M.B.A., Northwestern University  
Founded: 1979 Research Only Employees: 4,588
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $605M
2015 Global Revenue: $981M % Change from 2014: +2.8%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $376M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 38.3%

7. dunnhumby**

CEO: Simon Hay, B.A., University of Reading
Founded: 2001 Research Only Employees: 2,000
Parent Country: UK 2015 Home Country Revenue: $372M
2015 Global Revenue: $971M % Change from 2014: +17.8% 
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $599M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 61.7%


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimation by the report authors.

8. Westat

President & CEO: James E. Smith, Ph.D., University of Southern California
Founded: 1963 Research Only Employees: 2,000
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $491M
2015 Global Revenue: $510M % Change from 2014: -1.5%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $18M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 3.6%

9. INTAGE Holdings Inc.**

President & Representative Director: Kenji Miyakubi, B.A., Ehime University, Japan
Founded: 1960 Research Only Employees: 2,349
Parent Country: Japan 2015 Home Country Revenue: $345M
2015 Global Revenue: $376M % Change from 2014: -9.6%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $31M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 8.2%


** Fiscal year ended March 2016. 2015 currency exchange rate from yen to U.S. dollars decreased percent growth rate.

10. comScore

President & CEO: Serge Matta, M.B.A., American University
Founded: 1999 Research Only Employees: 1,700
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $268M
2015 Global Revenue: $369M % Change from 2014: +13.4%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $101M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 27.3%

11. Wood Mackenzie* ***

CEO: Stephen Halliday, B.S., University of Edinburgh
Founded: 1973 Research Only Employees: 1,000
Parent Country: UK 2015 Home Country Revenue: $153M
2015 Global Revenue: $365M % Change from 2014: -2.5%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $212M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 58.1%


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimation by the report authors

*** 2015 currency exchange rate from euros to U.S. dollars decreased percent growth rate

12. The NPD Group

President & COO: Karyn Schoenbart, B.A., University of Massachusetts
Chairman & CEO Tod Johnson, M.S.I.A., Carnegie Mellon University
Founded: 1966 Research Only Employees: 1,355
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $231m
2015 Global Revenue: $307M % Change from 2014: +5.3%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $77M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 24.9%

13. MACROMILL Inc.

Global CEO & Representative Executive Officer: Scott Ernst, B.S., University of Pennsylvania
Founded: 2000 Research Only Employees: 1,611
Parent Country: Japan 2015 Home Country Revenue: $205M
2015 Global Revenue: $296M % Change from 2014: +3.9%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $91M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 30.7%

14. J.D. Power*

President: Finbarr O'Neill, J.D., Fordham University Law School
Founded: 1968 Research Only Employees: 850
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $181M
2015 Global Revenue: $274M % Change from 2014: +1.8%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $93M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 33.8% 


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimation by the report authors.

15. ICF International

Chairman & CEO: Sudhakar Kesavan, M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Founded: 1967 Research Only Employees: 888
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $155M
2015 Global Revenue: $219M % Change from 2014: +2.9%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $65M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 29.5% 

16. Video Research Ltd.* **

President: Yuzuru Kato, B.A., Tokyo University
Founded: 1962 Research Only Employees: 410
Parent Country: Japan 2015 Home Country Revenue: $182M
2015 Global Revenue: $182M % Change from 2014: -10.7%
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $0 % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 0.0% 


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimation by the report authors

** Fiscal year ended March 2016. 2015 currency exchange rate from yen to U.S. dollars decreased percent growth rate

17. Decision Resources Group

Chairman & CEO: Jon Sandler, M.B.A., Harvard
Founded: 1990 Research Only Employees: 800
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $121M
2015 Global Revenue: $168M % Change from 2014: +2.8% 
2015 Revenue From Otutside Home Country: $47M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 28.1% 

18. M

aritzCX

President & CEO: Carine Clark, M.B.A., Brigham Young University
Founded: 1973 Research Only Employees: 800
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $111M
Global Revenue: $152M % Change from 2014: -12.9% 
2015 Home Country Revenue: $40M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 26.5%

19. Abt SRBI

President & CEO of Abt Associates: Kathleen L. Flanagan, M.S., University of Rochester
President & CEO of Abt SRBI: Michael Link, Ph.D., University of Southern California
Founded: 1965 Research Only Employees: 1,192
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $119M
Global Revenue: $124M % Change from 2014: -10.6% 
2015 Home Country Revenue: $5.1M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 4.1% 

20. YouGov

Global CEO & CFO: Stephan Shakespeare, M.S., Oxford University
Founded: 2000 Research Only Employees: 475
Parent Country: UK 2015 Home Country Revenue: $35M
Global Revenue: $123M % Change from 2014: +4.7%
2015 Home Country Revenue: $88M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 71.8%

21. ORC International

CEO: Simon Kooyman, M.B.A., Vlerick University
Founded: 1938 Research Only Employees: 540
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $83M
Global Revenue: $122M % Change from 2014: -3.0%
2015 Home Country Revenue: $39M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 31.8%

22. Lieberman Research Worldwide

Chairman & CEO: David Sackman, B.A., University of California at Los Angeles
Founded: 1973 Research Only Employees: 550
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $83M
Global Revenue: $120M % Change from 2014: +5.6%
2015 Home Country Revenue: $37M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 30.9%

23. Rentrak

Vice Chairman & President: William L. Livek, B.S., Southern Illinois University
Founded: 1977 Research Only Employees: 575
Parent Country: U.S. 2015 Home Country Revenue: $99M
Global Revenue: $116M % Change from 2014: +26.1%
2015 Home Country Revenue: $17.5M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 15.0 %

2

4. Médiamétrie* ***

Chairman & Managing Director: Bruno Chetaille
Founded: 1985 Research Only Employees: 641
Parent Country: France 2015 Home Country Revenue: $94.3M
Global Revenue: $105M % Change from 2014: -11.7%
2015 Home Country Revenue: $11M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 10.1%


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimation by the report authors

*** 2015 currency exchange rate from euros to U.S. dollars decreased percent growth rate

25. Cello Health*

Group COO: Stephen Highley
Founded: 2004 Research Only Employees: 400
Parent Country: UK 2015 Home Country Revenue: $56M
Global Revenue: $97M % Change from 2014: +1.7%
2015 Home Country Revenue: $41M % Global Revenue From Outside Home Country 42.0%


* Some or all figures are not made available by this company so instead are based upon estimations by the Report authors

 

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Michael Brereton & Diane Bowers
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