Responsibility for Learning

Introduction

Scott Armstrong seeks experimental evidence against the proposition that educational systems that assume that teachers are responsible for learning tend to depress the rate of learning

 ARC: Connections: ELMAR: Posting


I am almost ready to submit a chapter for the "Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning." It examines learning at universities from the standpoint of who is responsible for the learning: teacher or student. I focus on experimental evidence.

My basic conclusion is that educational systems that assume that teachers are responsible for learning tend to depress the rate of learning. Attempts to improve this system lead to further reductions in learning. (To paraphrase Russ Ackoff, "when you are doing the wrong thing, the better you do, the worser you are.")

Certainly this would lose hands done if people voted. But my only concern is with the experimental evidence.

Some reviewers think my summary of the evidence has been one-sided, but they are not able to provide experimental results on the other side. The literature is spread across many fields, so it is difficult to ensure that all key evidence has been included. Thus, I would appreciate further prior peer review, especially from those with evidence that would challenge my conclusions. (And yes, I am aware of the many studies using non-experimental evidence to support the belief that education leads to higher earnings.)

My chapter is restricted to about 3,000 words and it has been accepted subject to further review.

If you think you might be able to help, I would be happy to send you a working draft. Interestingly, a number of marketing professors have made contributions on this topic.

Scott

J. Scott Armstrong
Wharton School
U. of Pennsylvania, Phila., PA 19104
Home Phone 610-622-6480
armstrong@wharton.upenn.edu http://adprin.com
http://forprin.com
homepage://jscottarmstrong.com