2015 Winter Marketing Educators' Conference

San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter
101 Bowie Street, San Antonio, TX 78205
2/13/2015 7:30 AM - 2/15/2015 5:00 PM
Register before 1/17/2015 12:00 AM for early registration fee

2015 Winter Marketing Educators' Conference 

THE conference for marketing scholars from all points within the discipline. 2015 Winter AMA’s tracks will be filled with new research and theory. It is the perfect opportunity to interact and reconnect with peers from around the world.​ This year's event attracted over 600 participants from over 35 countries. Most attendees are from research universities. About three-quarters of the conference are tenure track faculty, the other quarter is doctoral students and others.


​Thank you to the 2015 Conference Co-Chairs​ and Track Chairs

Tom Brown, Oklahoma State University

Tom Brown 
Noble Found​ation ​Chair in Marketing Strategy & Profe​ssor of Marketing 
Oklahoma State University​


Vanitha Swaminathan, University of PittsburghVanitha Swaminathan
Professor of Business Administration & Robert W Murphy Faculty Fellow in Marketing
University of Pittsburgh​


Conference Theme: Marketing in a Global, Digital and Connected World 

The goal of 2015 Winter AMA is to bridge current research in marketing to an increasingly global, digital and highly connected world. As part of this conference, we will focus on a critical assessment of where our field is, and the theories that guide our current thinking. The conference will focus on taking stock of the current state-of-the-art with regard to marketing scholarship, and help define new themes or areas where our theory is not developed.​ The conference program is features competitive paper sessions, working paper/poster sessions and highlighted special sessions. The program is developed via a peer review process, with an acceptance rate of 57%. Join the conversation using #AMAWinter on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and beyond.


2015 Winter AMA Mobile Guide​ is now available!

  • Access complete conference program
  • Vote for best posters in poster session
  • Learn about conference sponsors
  • Check participant list
  • Monitor the conference twitter feed

Pre-Conference​: Linking Scholarship to Practice: Consumer and Firm Focused Advice for Scholars

Many marketing scholars conduct research to address current concerns of practicing marketing managers. There are often substantial challenges to such research, however, including identifying important issues, developing solid theory that addresses the issues, securing funding, arranging access to primary and/or secondary data, and many more. 

This special Pre-Conference Event brings together scholars who have mastered the art of conducting and publishing high quality research to learn from their experiences; speakers include V. Kumar (editor of Journal of Marketing), Leigh McAlister, Mary Jo BitnerSon Lam, and Andrew Stephen. Practitioners and MSI leaders will share ideas about how best to engages with firms and organizations with marketing scholarship. Two breakout sessions are planned:

** The Pursuit of Relevant, Meaningful Consumer-Focused Research with panelists: Darren Dahl, Robert Fisher, Joel Huber, Angela Lee, and Rich Lutz 
** The Pursuit of Relevant, Meaningful Firm-Focused Research with panelists:​ ​Mike Ahearne, Daniel Davied, Max Kilger, Vanitha Swaminathan and Bernie Jaworski

Sign-up for this event when registering for Winter AMA. The $25 fee includes lunch. Review the full agenda​.

Co-chaired by Sara Dommer, Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech University and Scott Cowley, PhD Student, Arizona State University. Sponsored by: AMA Academic Council; Sheth Foundation; OSU Center for Customer Interface Excellence; AMA Consumer Behavior Special Interest Group; AMA Doctoral Student Special Interest Group; Marketing Science Institute


Panel on Work-Life Balance and ​Women in Marketing Scholars Lunch​

Please join us for lunch on Friday as we hear from a panel of scholars on how they juggle 2 careers + kids households either before during and after tenure and the PhD program!  We will hear tips, advice, and ideas on this key juggling act from the following individuals

Tonya Bradford, University of Notre Dame 
Alan Malter, University of Illinois at Chicago 
Stephanie Noble, University of Tennessee at Knoxville 
Andrew Stephens, University of Pittsburgh

Sponsored in conjunction with the Women in Marketing Scholars lunch, however, the event is not limited to women – work life balance affects us all.​ To register, click on the registration tab​ or call +1.800.262.1150


​Conference Co-Chairs​

Tom Brown, Oklahoma State University

Tom Brown 
Noble Found​ation ​Chair in Marketing Strategy & Profe​ssor of Marketing 
Oklahoma State University


Vanitha Swaminathan, University of PittsburghVanitha Swaminathan
Professor of Business Administration & Robert W Murphy Faculty Fellow in Marketing
University of Pittsburgh



Conference Photo Policy

Registrants of AMA Events agree to allow AMA and its official photographer to photograph them in the context of the conference. Footage captured by the official AMA photographer may be used in future print and electronic promotional and archival materials. For questions or concerns, please call 800.262.1150 or email info@ama.org.​


​Conference Cancellation Policy​

All cancellations and requests for refunds must be submitted to the AMA via email at mweingarden@ama.org. Cancellations received four weeks prior to the event start date will receive a refund minus a $75 early cancellation fee. Cancellations received after that date will receive a refund minus a $150 late cancellation fee. ​

Registrants wishing to cancel may send someone to take their place without penalty if they send a written request with the replacement person’s name to info@ama.org at least two weeks prior to the event start date.

No refunds will be given as of 30 January 2015 (two weeks prior to the event start date). 


A conference registration may not be shared by two or more individuals. Space is limited and on-site registration cannot be guaranteed. Separate cancellation policies may exist for pre-conference programs, tutorials, and other associated events. Hotel and transportation reservation cancellations must be handled by the individual registrant directly with the hotel, airline and/or other company.​

​Conference Schedule at a Glance (tentative)

Access the Conference Program​
Review Highlighted Special Sessions​

Friday (13 February 2015)

0​7:30 AM - 1:00 PM​​ - Linking Scholarship to Practice: Consumer & Firm Focused Advice for Scholars​**​
01:00 PM - 02:15 PM ​- Academic Sessions
02:30 PM - 03:45 PM - ​Academic Sessions
03:00 PM - 04:00 PM - Refreshments in Foyer ​
04:00 PM - 05:15 PM​ - Academic Sessions
​05:15 PM - 06:30 PM - Welcome and Poster Reception

Saturday (​14 February 2015)

07:30 AM - 08:30 AM ​- Continental Breakfast in Foyer
0​8:00 AM - 09:15 AM - Academic Sessions
09:30 AM - 10:45 AM - Academic Sessions
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM - Refreshments in Foyer​
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM - Academic Sessions ​
12:15 PM - 01:45 PM - Awards Luncheon
​02:00 PM - 03:15 PM - Academic Sessions
03:15 PM - 03:45 PM - Refreshments in Foyer​
03:30 PM - 04:45 PM - Academic Sessions
​05:00 PM - 06:00 PM - SIG Receptions
​06:15 PM - 07:30 PM - Saturday Evening Reception

​Sunday (15 February 2015)

07:30 AM - 08:30 AM - Continetal Breakfast in Foyer
​08:30 AM - 09:45 AM
- Academic Sessions 
09:45 AM - 10:15 AM - Refreshments in Foyer
10:15 AM - 11:30 AM
- Academic Sessions
11:30 AM - 01:00 PM - Lunch (on your own)
12:45 PM - 01:15 PM - Refreshments in Foyer
01:00 PM - 02:15 PM
​- Academic Sessions​


**Linking Scholarship to Practice: Consumer and Firm Focused Advice for Scholars
Friday, February 13, 2015 | 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Many marketing scholars conduct research to address current concerns of practicing marketing managers. There are often substantial challenges to such research, however, including identifying important issues, developing solid theory that addresses the issues, securing funding, arranging access to primary and/or secondary data, and many more.​

This special event brings together scholars who have mastered the art of conducting and publishing high quality research to learn from their experiences​

Pre-Conference Agenda
08:00 AM - Welcome
08:10 AM - Relevance to Research: What “Relevance” Means & Why It MattersLeigh McAlister
08:40 AM - Coming Up With Relevant Research Ideas - Mary Jo Bitner
09:00 AM - Writing Managerial Implications - Son Lam
09:20 AM - Balancing Theory With Hot Topic Relevant ResearchAndrew Stephen
09:40 AM - Maximizing the Reach of Academic Research InfluenceV. Kumar
10:00 AM - Refreshments
10:30 AM - Breakout on the Pursuit of Relevant, Meaningful Consumer-Focused ResearchDarren Dahl, Robert Fisher, Joel Huber, Angela Lee, and Rich Lutz; Co-chaired by Robin Coulter and Linda Price
10:30 AM - Breakout on the Pursuit of Relevant, Meaningful Firm-Focused Research - Mike Ahearne, Daniel Davied, Bernie Jaworski, Max Kilger and Vanitha Swaminathan
12:00 PM - Lunch/Managerially Relevant Research 

Co-chaired by Sara Dommer, Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech University and Scott Cowley, PhD Student, Arizona State University. Sponsored by: AMA Academic Council; Sheth Foundation; OSU Center for Customer Interface Excellence; AMA Consumer Behavior Special Interest Group; AMA Doctoral Student Special Interest Group; Marketing Science Institute

Panel on Work-Life Balance
Friday, February 13, 2015 | 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Please join us for lunch on Friday as we hear from a panel of scholars on how they juggle 2 careers + kids, households either before, during, and after tenure and the PhD program!  We will hear tips, advice, and ideas on this key juggling act from the following individuals:  

Tonya Bradford, University of Notre Dame 
Alan Malter, University of Illinois at Chicago 
Stephanie Noble, University of Tennessee at Knoxville 
Andrew Stephens, University of Pittsburgh

Sponsored in conjunction with the Women in Marketing Scholars lunch, however, the event is not limited to women – work life balance affects us all.



​Full Conference Program​ (with session​s and speakers)​



Conference Theme: Marketing in a Global, Digital and Connected World 

The goal of the Winter Marketing Educators' Conference (Winter AMA) is to bridge current research in marketing to an increasingly global, digital and highly connected world.  ​​

Winter AMA  is a peer-reviewed conference that accepted nearly 500 paper submissions and accepted 44% of those submissions. The conference includes a diverse number of tra​cks ​lead by distinguished track chairs from across the discipline.​


Highlighted ​Special Sessions​

Friday (click the link for more info)
• Crafting Impactful Theory for Understanding a Changing Marketplace​ (1:00 p.m.)
• Market Transition and Implementation of Marketing Concept​ (1:00 p.m.)
• Sales in Emerging Economies (1:00 p.m.)
• Socializing Consumer Creativity​ (1:00 p.m.)
• Where Marketing & Finance Agree on Measurement for Creating Value​ (1:00 p.m.)
• Frontline Marketing Management: Problems, Models, and Insights​ (2:30 p.m.)
• Examining Sales Person Cognitive Processes and Knowledge Structures​ (2:30 p.m.)
• Frontline Marketing Management: Issues, Theories, and Directions (4:00 p.m.)
• You Provide the Information, But Who Provides the Protection? New Directions in Social Media Privacy​ (4:00 p.m.)
• Strategic Implications of Customer, Product, and Firm-Level Decisions​ (4:00 p.m.)
• Field Experiements for Marketing Research​ (4:00 p.m.

Saturday (click the link for more info)
• Power and Status: Implications for Consumer Preferences and Choice​ (8:00 a.m.)
• Meet the Editors Session I (9:30 a.m.)
• Growing and Protecting Brand Equity: Novel Strategies and Antecedents (9:30 a.m.)
• Market Orientation: Current Research Initiatives (9:30 a.m.)
• Meet the Editors Session II (11:00 a.m.)
• Perspectives of Presence: Studying Changing Consumptionscapes (11:00 a.m.)
• Uncovering Innovation Insights Through Various Lens (11:00 a.m.)
• Natural/Field Experimental Research in Selling and Sales Management (11:00 a.m.)
• Product Development and Social Media: Customer Driven Innovation (11:00 a.m.)
• Sales Meets the C-Suite (2:00 p.m.)
• User Innovation and the Maker Movement (2:00 p.m.)

SIG Special Sessions on Saturday (click the link for more info)
• GlobalSIG: Contemporary Develments in Global Marketing Research (3:30 p.m.)
• IOSIG: Empirical Challenges, Solutions and Opportunities in IO Research (3:30 p.m.)
• MASSIG: Broadening the Paradigm of Marketing as Exchange: Reflections from the Field and Insights Moving Forward (3:30 p.m.)
• RelationshipSIG: Technology and Relationship Marketing: A Love-Hate Relationship (3:30 p.m.)
• Retail & Pricing SIG: Digital and Interactive for Enhancing Customer (3:30 p.m.)
• SalesSIG: Death of a Salesman: The Role of Today's B2B Salesperson From the Purchaser's Perspective (3:30 p.m.)
• ServSIG: The Good and the Bad of Customer Contribution to Services: Traits, Expectations, and Perceptions (3:30 p.m.)
• SportsSIG: Sports marketing and Sponsorship on the Global Stage (3:30 p.m.)
• TeachingSIG: Teaching and Learning Creatively: Pedadgogical Innovations to Stimulate Intellectual Curiosity (3:30 p.m.)

Sunday (click the link for more info)
• How and Why do Brands Impact Firm Performance and Create Value (8:00 a.m.) 
• DocSIG: Perfect Practices and Perils of Resarch Project Management (Sun, 8:00 a.m.)
• MASSIG: Marketing's Place in the Healthcare and Society Discussion: Challenges, Opportunities, and Agenda​​ (10:15 a.m.)


Crafting Impactful Theory for Understanding a Changing Marketplace​ 

Manjit S. Yadav, Texas A&M University

Panelists:
Leigh McAlister, University of Texas at Austin
Neil Morgan, Indiana University
Roland Rust, University of Maryland

The conference theme is Global, Connected & Digital World. Guided by input from the conference co-chairs, Tom Brown and Vanitha Swaminathan, the Special Session features influential scholars’ perspectives on developing impactful ideas and theories in a rapidly-changing marketplace. The special session will be structured primarily as a “panel discussion” -- short opening remarks followed by integrative discussion. The goal is to make the session as interactive as possible so that some energetic debate and discussion can occur.

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Implementation of the Marketing Concept in Developed and Transition Markets: Comparison of the US and Russian Firms 
Johanna Frösén, St. Petersburg State University

Does Market/Customer Orientation Matter in Transition Market? Insights from Evolution of Russian Firms
Maria Smirnova, Saint Petersburg State University; Vera Rebyazina, National Research University

Which Capabilities Matter in Transition Economy? Longitudinal Analysis of Russian Firms Alexander Krasnikov, George Washington University; Kelly Hewett, University of Tennessee; Chad W. Autry, University of Tennessee

In this session we aim integrating resource-based theory, capabilities perspective, market orientation framework, and institutional theory to examine how firms in the transition market had become competitive. We focus on a single transition market, Russian Federation, for several reasons. First, it is one of the largest former planned economies with presence of monopolies almost in every industry. Second, according to World Bank Russian Federation recently became high-income per capita non-OECD country, indicating that market reforms indeed contributed to wealth growth. Finally, by focusing on single economy we were able to integrate multiple sources and multiple methods to examine marketing capabilities, market orientation, and overall competitiveness of firms in different industries and periods. This session is geared for researchers in marketing strategy and international marketing.​


Sales in Emerging Economies
Chair: Jeff Tanner & Murali Mantrala

Sales Research in Emerging Economies – A Theoretical Foundation
Jag Sheth, Emory University

Operationalizing Research in Emerging Economies: The Case of China & Latin America
Keith Richards, University of Tennessee–Chattanooga

Issues in Sales Management: China & India
Shaoming Zou, University of Missouri; Murali Mantrala, University of Missouri​

This session is designed to encourage sales research in emerging economies Although sales forces are pervasive in all economies, there is a paucity of rigorous sales force-focused research set in emerging economies, e.g., BRICS, etc. Emerging economies are the growth frontier for many global companies. Sustainable economic development is also one of the most important foundations for peace and well-being. The salesperson and sales management plays a vital role in emerging economies. The purpose of this special session is to stimulate new research on personal selling & sales management in emerging economies by addressing theoretical needs, practical concerns, and resource limitations.


Socializing Consumer Creativity 
Chair: Eric J. Arnould, University of Southern Denmark

The Practices of Consumer Creativity: Value and Vintaging
Kat Duffy, University of Essex

Creativity of Consumption and Spaces: The Brixton Pound
Mario Campana, Cass Business School

Consumer Creativity Shaping the Collective Imagination
Gry Høngsmark Knudsen, University of Southern Denmark

This session develops the position that because individuals are socio-cultural beings, consumer creativity is simultaneously individual and sociocultural. Consequently, in each of three papers presented in this session, we argue that creative expression is also cultural expression: engaging with places, others, and cultural artefacts to produce new cultural artefacts, generally employing cultural knowledge to generate culture. We explore how consumer creativity unfolds in three places: pop up vintage markets, fan fiction on social media, and a gentrifying neighborhood. Three cultural artifacts are central to the processes described: vintage clothing, fan- and commercially-made film trailers, and a complementary currency, respectively. Moreover, constraint and tension between cultural actors is also a dimension of creativity we explore.​


Frontline Marketing Management: Problems, Models, and Insights​ 
Jagdip Singh, Case Western Reserve University; Tom Brown, Oklahoma State University

A Survey of Methods in Research on Salesperson Perceptions 
Son K. Lam, University of Georgia 

Problem Solving in the Frontlines: Dynamic Language and Body Cue Analysis 
Detelina Marinova, University of Missouri 

The Service Working Alliance between Customer and Service Provider: A Novel Diagnostic for Service Relationships and Its Impact on Relationship Performance 
Jenny van Doorn, University of Groningen 

Do Firms Need a Frontline Marketing Doctrine? 
Goutam Challagalla,  Georgia Institute of Technology 

What Goes Around Comes Around Stronger: A Cross-Lagged Test of the Relationship between Customer Satisfaction and Employee Job Satisfaction 
Alex R. Zablah, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Marketing frontlines—human and technological assets that enable interactions with a company’s customers, suppliers and distributors—in large part determine the competitive advantage and its landscape in many service industries. Organizational frontlines are uniquely positioned to:

* uncover innovative solutions to emergent customer problems
* generate learning from market exchanges and customers 
* quickly sense and craft agile responses to market change 
* effectively connect with heterogeneous or elusive customers

Yet, the role of organizational frontlines in addressing these questions is poorly understood. Theory and models that explain how and why some organizations are endowed with frontline advantage are rare. As a result, the opportunity in Rayport and Jaworksi’s (2004) insight that “interactions with customers, and the customer experiences that result from those interactions, are, for many businesses, the sole remaining frontier of competitive advantage,” continues to be largely untapped.

Marketing is well suited to lead advances in the area of frontline advantage. Interactions with customers are the bread and butter of Marketing Thought, and designing effective customer interfaces is its core contribution to Organizational Practice.This special session present cutting edge empirical research on frontline marketing topics from various perspectives. ​


Examining Sales Person Cognitive Processes and Knowledge Structures 
Chair: Adam Rapp, University of Alabama; Richard McFarland, West Virginia

Exploring the Neural Basis of Trust Formation in Marketing 
Richard McFarland, West Virginia University; Christopher Nelson, West Virginia University

Salesperson Evaluative Knowledge: Role of Pattern Recognition in Identifying Customer Opportunities 
Ryan Mullins, Clemson University

Calibrating Salesperson Knowledge across the Customer-Salesperson Dyad: Implications for Rapport 
Brian Murtha, University of Kentucky; Blair Kidwell, The Ohio State University; Chris Blocker, Colorado State University

The Challenge of Competitive Intelligence: The Importance of Cognitive Mapping to Maximize Intelligence Usefulness 
Adam Rapp, University of Alabama; Thomas Baker, University of Alabama; Jessica Ogilvie, University of Alabama; Kris Lindsey, University of Alabama

This special session includes four papers/presentations focusing on cognitive processes or cognitive knowledge structures within buyer-seller interactions. Historically, sales research has examined salesperson’ or buyers’ behaviors during sales calls to determine the subsequent effects on sales performance and other sales outcomes. Unfortunately, much of this research has ignored the cognitive processes and cognitive knowledge structures that manifest themselves later as the inputs and behaviors in these more customary models. However, a deeper focus and call for research on these cognitive processes has become evident in the marketing literature. This altered approach recognizes that individuals are goal-seeking and that behavior is simply the end results of a complex set of underlying cognitive processes. Submissions point to the importance and value of gaining a deeper understanding of developing and incorporating different cognitive tools.​​

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Frontline Marketing Management: Issues, Theories, and Directions 
Mike Brady, Florida State University; Jagdip Singh, Case Western Reserve University

Integrating Frontline Management and Customer Experience 
Mary Jo Bitner, Arizona State University

Five Key Challenges in Designing Great Customer Experiences 
Bernard Jaworski, Claremont Graduate University

On Exploring Frontline Marketing Management 
Ajay K. Kohli, Georgia Tech

Frontline Quality and the Impact of Technology 
Roland T. Rust, University of Maryland

Macro and Micro Issues in Sales Force Management 
Michael Ahearne, University of Houston

Marketing frontlines—human and technological assets that enable interactions with a company’s customers, suppliers and distributors—in large part determine the competitive advantage and its landscape in many service industries. Organizational frontlines are uniquely positioned to:

* uncover innovative solutions to emergent customer problems 
* generate learning from market exchanges and customers 
* quickly sense and craft agile responses to market change 
* effectively connect with heterogeneous or elusive customers

Yet, the role of organizational frontlines in addressing these questions is poorly understood. Theories that explain how and why some organizations are endowed with frontline advantage are especially lacking.

The purpose of the special session to thought leaders address three questions that motivate theory building and development in the area of Frontline Marketing Management:
* What are five interesting frontline problems that deserve research attention? 
* What currently are the big theoretical gaps in studying these frontline problems? 

* What theoretical frameworks are particularly promising for studying frontline issues?​

You Provide the Information, But Who Provides the Protection? New Directions in Social Media Privacy
Chair: Alexa K. Fox, University of Memphis

Private Information in a Social World: An Examination of Presentational Mode in Privacy Policies on Social Networking Sites
Alexa K. Fox, University of Memphis; Marla B. Royne Stafford, University of Memphis

Putting A Price On Privacy In Social Media
David Weiner, University of Pittsburgh; Cait Lamberton, University of Pittsburgh; Andrew T. Stephen, University of Pittsburgh

Exchanging Information on Social Media: The Devil in the Details
Kristen L. Walker, California State University Northridge

Although the marketing academic literature has started to consider social media marketing as an important topic of study, social media privacy remains a largely unexplored topic. Indeed, it is unclear as to whether consumers understand and are concerned with their privacy as social media users. The goal of this special session is to shed light into how consumers perceive their privacy when using social media and the implications these perceptions have for social media marketers. The session will begin with presentations of several research projects, followed by a discussion by the presenters about new research directions in social media privacy.


Strategic Implications of Customer, Product, and Firm-Level Decisions
Chair: Amalesh Sharma, Georgia State University; Kihyun Hannah Kim, Georgia State University

Managing Customer Cash Flow Volatility to Enhance Firm Value
Denish Shah, Georgia State University; V Kumar, Georgia State University; Kihyun Hannah Kim, Georgia State University; JeeWon Brianna Choi, Georgia State University

Dynamics of Distribution: The Impact of Market Type and Macroeconomy
V Kumar, Georgia State University; Sarang Sunder, Georgia State University; Amalesh Sharma, Georgia State University

Income Inequality Within and Between Countries – How it Affects the Acceptance of New Consumer Products
Ashish Sood, Georgia State University; Christophe Van den Bulte, University of Pennsylvania

A fundamental role of marketing is to create value for the firm. Specifically, marketing creates value by managing customers and marketing mix elements. The topic of value creation by marketing has also been one of the top research priorities of Marketing Science Institute. The overall goal of this session is to understand different marketing strategy on value creation for the firm’s various stakeholders. A secondary goal is to articulate the implications of the stream of research on firm value creation process for marketing practitioners.

Field Experiements for Marketing Research
Chair: Andre Bonfrer, Australian National University; Michael Braun, Southern Methodist University

What is the value of a Facebook like?
Daniel Mochon, Tulane University; Karen Johnson, Discovery Vitality; Janet Schwartz, Tulane University; Dan Ariely, Duke University

Real-time Mobile Geo-conquesting Promotions
Nathan Fong, Temple University; Zheng Fang, Sichuan University; Xueming Luo, Temple University

Customer Acquisition via Display Advertising Using Multi-Armed Bandit Experiments
Eric Schwartz, University of Michigan; Eric Bradlow, University of Pennsylvania; Peter Fader, University of Pennsylvania


MASB:  Where Marketing & Finance Agree on Measurement for Creating Value​

About the Marketing Accountability Standards Board 
Meg Blair, MASB 
A brief overview of MASB: Its Mission, Members, Leadership, game-changing Goals and the Projects underway to achieve them.

Brand Investment and Valuation Project 
Frank Findley, MSW•ARS Research 
Marketing and Finance practitioners agree that it is marketing’s job to create, sustain and build brands that produce current and future economic benefits for the firm.  Current methods of brand valuation are divergent, inconsistent, and generally not useful for financial forecasting, planning, justifying investment or improving return. The objective of this game-changing project is to establish “generally accepted brand investment and valuation standards” that will provide consistency, comparability, credibility and actionability. The project involves trials among 6 participating marketers and 12 categories (>100 brands).

Common Language in Marketing Project 
Paul Farris, University of Virginia 
In partnership with AMA and other marketing industry associations, MASB has launched a web platform for the Common Language Dictionary. Establishing industry endorsed common language and definitions will eliminate ambiguity in marketing terminology and encourage trust and collaboration within and across the marketing industry & business communities.  How to access this marketing dictionary of industry endorsed common language and definitions via PC and mobile devices will be demonstrated.

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​Power and Status: Implications for Consumer Preferences and Choice​ 
Chair: Jennifer L. Stoner, University of Minnesota

A Typology of Brand Power
Jennifer L. Stoner, University of Minnesota; Carlos J. Torelli, University of Minnesota

Striving for Superiority: Face Ratio, Anthropomorphism and Product Preference
Ahreum Maeng, University of Kansas; Pankaj Aggarwal, University of Toronto

Power and Product Preferences: Examining the Moderating Role of Self-construal and Consumption Setting on Purchase Behavior
Umut Kubat, Yildirim Beyazit University; Vanitha Swaminathan, University of Pittsburgh

How Does Power Distance Belief Affect Status Consumption?
Huachao Gao, University of Texas-San Antonio; Karen Page Winterich, Penn State University; Yinlong Zhang, University of Texas-San Antonio

This special session presents four research papers that explore the interaction of various dimensions of power and status. By looking at the nuances of each of these constructs, the researchers find effects on consumer preferences and choice. The findings hold important implications for marketing in a variety of areas including not only power and status, but branding and consumer behavior as a whole.​


Meet the Editors Session I​
Chair: Mark Houston, Texas A&M University

Panelists (Ordered alphabetically by Journal):
Jacob Goldenberg and Eitan Muller, International Journal of Research in Marketing
Darren Dahl, Journal of Consumer Research
V. Kumar, Journal of Marketing
Robert Meyer, Journal of Marketing Research
Tomas Hult, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science
Preyas Dasai, Marketing Science

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Growing and Protecting Brand Equity: Novel Strategies and Antecedents​ 
Chair: Jennifer Stoner, University of Minnesota; Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Koç University

Leveraging and then Replenishing Brand Equity: Strategically Sequencing Major and Minor Innovations
Timothy B. Heath, University of South Florida; Subimal Chatterjee, Binghamton University; Suman Basuroy, University of Oklahoma; Thorsten Hennig-Thurau, University of Muenster; Bruno Kocher, HEC Lausanne; Max Chauvin, ESSEC Business School

Portfolio- and Image-Based Abstractness: Consequences for Building and Protecting Brand Equity
Jennifer L. Stoner, University of Minnesota; Carlos J. Torelli, University of Minnesota; Alokparna (Sonia) Monga¸ Rutgers University

Brand Scandal Spillover Effects: Thinking Styles and the Nature of a Brand Scandal
Yun Lee, Virginia State University; Nara Youn, Hongik University; Dhananjay Nayakankuppam, University of Iowa​

This session looks at a variety of strategies that can help to build and protect brand equity. A paper by Heath et al. examines the role of major and minor innovations on leveraging brand equity. Research by Stoner et al. investigates how abstract brand concepts based on either a strategy of building abstract product portfolio or of associating the brand with abstract human-like meanings can grow and protect brand equity. A final paper by Lee et al. demonstrates how the differential effects of internal/external brand scandals on brand dilution as a function of consumers’ holistic/analytic thinking styles

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Market Orientation: Current Research Intitiatives​
Chair: Markus Giesler, York University; Ashlee Humphreys, Northwestern University

Can Geographic Brands be Market Oriented?
Alan Malter, University of Illinois at Chicago; Pelin Bicen, Pennsylvania State University

Wine Worlds: The Creation of Value through Alignment and Misalignment of Marketplace Meanings
Ashlee Humphreys, Northwestern University; Gregory Carpenter, Northwestern University

Citizen Orientation: Replacing the Market in the Political Landscape
Sébastien Tellier, HEC Montréal; Gary F. Gebhardt, HEC Montréal; Jean-Sébastien Marcoux, HEC Montréal

The Sociological Shaping of Consumer Values into a Market Orientation
Markus Giesler, York University; Ela Veresiu, Witten/Herdecke University

Market orientation – “an organizationwide generation of market intelligence pertaining to current and future customer needs, dissemination of the intelligence across departments, and organizationwide responsiveness to it” (Kholi and Jaworski 1990, 6) – is widely celebrated as key to a firm’s success. The goal of this special session is to contribute to this attractive and expansive stream of research by offering new theoretical lenses and managerial strategies for implementing a market orientation using timely and relevant research currently being conducted. Each project was selected because it delivers a ripe conceptualization drawn from longitudinal, market-level, and multifirm data from three distinct industries. Together, the projects focus on new ways of theorizing market orientation and finding new managerial solutions for geography brands, technology brands, and the wine industry, which should be appealing to a broad array of marketing researchers and practitioners.

Alan J. Malter will first investigate how geographic brands may become market oriented. Specifically, this study examines the multiple layers and hierarchy of tensions that characterize this market system, and how a market orientation might emerge. Second, Ashlee Humphreys and Gregory Carpenter will investigate how value can be created through the alignment and misalignment of marketplace meanings. In this research, the authors undertake a market-level study of the wine industry in an attempt to answer three questions. 1) Why do gaps between producer and consumer values exist? 2) How do differences emerge? 3) Why do they persist despite extensive consumer research on the part of marketers? Finally, Markus Giesler and Ela Veresiu will explore how technology innovation brands can socialize target consumers into a market orientation. The researchers conducted a comparative longitudinal ethnography of three recent technological innovation projects: Nest Labs’ attempt to create a market for its learning thermostat, Tesla Motor’s attempt to create a market for its electric automobile, and Apple’s attempt to create a market for the AppleTV. The authors discuss how a firm’s value-framing ability influences innovation success and provide a repertoire of effective value framing strategies.

To conclude, we anticipate our discussant Ajay Kohli – a pioneer in the field of market orientation – will synthesize our work, guide audience discussions, and offer novel directions for future research.

Meet the Editors Session II​ 
Chair: Mark Houston, Texas A&M University

Panelists (Ordered alphabetically by Journal): 
Amna Kirmani, Journal of Consumer Psychology
Constantine Katsikeas, Journal of International Marketing
Greg Marshall, Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice
David Stewart, Journal of Public Policy and Marketing
Shankar Ganesan, Journal of Retailing
Steve Baron, Journal of Service Research

Perspectives of Presence: Studying Changing Consumptionscapes
Chair: Jakob Braun, University of Texas-Pan American; Nikilesh Dholakia, University of Rhode Island

Understanding Presence and its Role in Consumer Experience
Jakob Braun, University of Texas–Pan American

Flaunting Viscerally and Swaggering Cybernetically: Patterns of Projecting Materialism and Experiential Hedonism on Social Media
Jingyi Duan, University of Rhode Island; Ruby Roy Dholakia, University of Rhode Island and Nikilesh Dholakia, University of Rhode Island

Mobile Presence, Ubiquity, and Interactivity
Syagnik Banerjee, University of Michigan – Flint; Ruby Roy Dholakia, University of Rhode Island; Nikilesh Dholakia, University of Rhode Island

Consumer Adaptation Strategies: Unbundling of Presence, Task Continuity, and Multi-tasking
Mohammadali Zolfagharian, University of Texas-Pan American

Networked Metaconsumption and the Vanishing Music Industry: The Growing Presence of Absence
Ian Reyes, University of Rhode Island; Nikhilesh Dholakia, University of Rhode Island

The Significance of the Presence of Absence
A. Fuat Fırat, University of Texas—Pan American

In today’s world consumptionscapes are continuously evolving. We have the responsibility to increase the understanding of these changes by developing new theories that guide our thinking. To this end, we will focus in this session on the transforming nature of consumption from different perspectives of presence. Presence is generally understood as the fact of being in a particular place and someone/something that is seen in a particular place. Translated to the consumption context, presence can be considered as pertaining to the consumer or to consumer objects. These are the two perspectives that will be addressed in this special session proposal.

Uncovering Innovation Insights Through Various Lens​
Chair: Rebecca Slotegraaf, Indiana University

Herding Behavior in Crowdfunding Communities
Venkar Kuppuswamy, University of North Carolina; Barry L. Bayus, University of North Carolina

How Competitive New Product Actions in Response to a Disruptive New Product Introduction influence Industry Growth
Rebecca J. Slotegraaf, Indiana University; Sandeep Chandukala, Indiana University; Mitchell C. Olsen, Indiana University; Girish Mallapragada, Indiana University

Dive & Disruption of Successful Current Products: Measures, Global Patterns and Predictive Model
Javier Palacios, Universidad Adolfo Ibañez; Gerard J. Tellis, USC

Is Two Better Than One? How Investors React To New Product Releases Announced Concurrently With Other Corporate News
Nooshin Lotfi, Texas A&M University; Alina Sorescu, Texas A&M University
 
The goal of this special session is to bring together leading scholars in the new product development (NPD) field to present some of their cutting-edge research. The research presented in this session offers new insights by approaching the domain from a different angle or tackling a new area. Although the four projects span different elements within the innovation process, they each offer important new insight that will likely spark further research within different areas of innovation. This session is also expected to offer important contributions to the discipline as it introduces new areas, explores relatively untapped terrain, and stimulates new directions for the field of innovation.

Natural/Field Experimental Research in Selling and Sales Management​
Chair: Michael Ahearne, University of Houston; Thomas Steenburgh, University of Virginia

Incentives versus Reciprocity: Insights from a Field Experiment
Doug J. Chung, Harvard University; Das Narayandas, Harvard University

Is Cash King? A Field Intervention on Mental Accounting in a Sales Force
Madhu Viswanathan, University of Arizona; Xiaolin Li, University of Minnesota; Om Narasimhan, London School of Economics; George John, University of Minnesota
 
Hot Hand, Cold Hand, and Confidence Contagion: The Persistence of Losing Streaks in Call Centers and Their Effect on the Performance of Others 
Michael Ahearne, University of Houston; Seshadri N. Turunillai, University of Houston; Nick Lee, Loughborough University; Thomas Steenburgh, University of Virginia

Thomas J. Steenburgh facilitates this session of sales thought leaders of natural and field experimental research. In the first presentation, Chung and Narayandas discuss how incentives and framing of incentives influence agent behavior and productivity from a six-month long field experiment. Viswanathan, Li, Narasimhan, and John utilize a multi-method empirical approach, field intervention and survey, to explore the fungibility of money in the context of salesperson effort. Ahearne, Turunillai, Lee, and Steenburgh examine three-months of individual sales call behaviors and outcomes, as well as sales agent characteristics to explore how a sales agent’s success (failure) in the current time period is related to their past success (failure).  

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Product Development and Social Media: Customer Driven Innovation​
Chair: Keith Marion Smith, University of Georgia; John Hulland, University of Georgia

Lower Connectivity Is Better: The Effects of Network Structure on Customer Innovativeness in Interdependent Ideation Tasks
Andrew T. Stephen, University of Pittsburgh; Peter Pal Zubcsek, University of Florida; Jacob Goldenberg, IDC Herzliya

Brand Remixing: The Nokia Lumia 820 Case
Aric Rindfleisch, University of Illinois; Matt O’Hern, University of New Hampshire

Post-Purchase Digital Product Development: Co-Creation Segmentation and Social Influence
Keith Marion Smith; University of Georgia; John Hulland, University of Georgia; Andrew T. Stephen, University of Pittsburgh 

The aim of this special session is to examine new ways in which social media and digital marketing tools are utilized in modern customer-sourced product development activities. Researchers investigating open source development have established the importance of social networks and social media platforms for project success. However, customers have begun to more recently partner directly with firms to innovate on firm-branded and firm-developed products as opposed to exclusively customer-developed products. With a focus on actionable marketing outcomes, all three papers will examine online networks of innovation and product development.

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Sales Meets the C-Suite​
Chair: Stavroula Spyropoulou, Leeds University

Sales Doctrine: A Means for Sales Force Alignment
Goutam Challagalla, Georgia Tech; Brian R. Murtha, University of Kentucky

(When) Should Marketing and Sales Report to One Top Manager? An Executive Job Demands Perspective
Stephen J. Anderson-Macdonald, London Business School; D. Eric Boyd, James Madison University; Rajesh K. Chandy, London Business School

The Impact of Wall Street’s Expectations on Firms’ Management of Key Account Customers
Michael J. Ahearne, University of Houston; Jeffrey P. Boichuk, University of Virginia; Raghuram Bommaraju, University of Houston; Thomas J. Steenburgh, University of Virginia

Together, the papers in this session cover macro-level sales research that falls at the executive suite level of sales organizations. Challagalla and Murtha discuss how sales executives can, and under what conditions sales executives should, develop a sales doctrine to optimally align the efforts of their sales forces. Anderson-Macdonald, Boyd, and Chandy employ a quasi-experimental approach to understand the costs and benefits associated with appointing a marketing and sales executive, using an executive job demands perspective. Ahearne, Boichuk, Bommaraju, and Steenburgh use BoardEx data in conjunction with a novel dataset collected from sales executives of public firms to study the affect of CEO functional background on the finance-sales interface and the earnings management practices of sales organizations. 

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User Innovation and the Maker Movement
Chair: Aric Rindfleisch, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne; Hope Jensen Schau, University of Arizona

User Innovation in the Surfing Industry: An Exploration of Marketplace Role Fluidity
Melissa Akaka, University of Denver; Hope Jensen Schau, University of Arizona; Steve Vargo, University of Hawaii

The Maker Movement: Implications for Retailing Thought and Practice
Aric Rindfleisch, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne

Crops to Crafts: Negotiating Authenticity in Farmers’ Markets
Hope Jensen Schau, University of Arizona; Matthew Mars, University of Arizona

Crowd Capital and Innovation: Putting Creative Consumers to Work
Jan Kietzmann, Simon Fraser University; Leyland Pitt, Simon Fraser Universiy; Karen Robson, Simon Fraser University

Marketing scholarship largely operates under the assumption that products are made by firms, sold by retailers, and bought by consumers. Although still dominant, there are growing signs that this model is beginning to crack. This is evidenced by a variety of growing research areas, including those centered on value co-creation (e.g., Prahalad and Ramaswamy 2004; Vargo et al. 2008), consumer cultures (e.g., Arnould and Thompson 2005; Schau et al. 2009), and user innovation (e.g., Manning, Bearden and Madden 1995). This research draws attention toward the role of customers as “producers” and creative participants of value creation, rather than passive “consumers” of market offerings. The recognition of customers as active participants in production processes, sometimes called prosumers (Cova and Cova 2012) and in aggregate the maker movement, questions traditional models that centers on the role of firms in the production of value propositions, and, ultimately, value creation.

Given its recent rise and opposition to conventional wisdom, this important emerging movement is quickly gaining considerable attention from both academics and practitioners (e.g., Anderson 2012; O’Hern and Rindfleisch 2010). Conceptually, this movement embodies a central tenet of Service Dominant Logic theory--the idea that manufacturers create value potential that is left inert until consumers co-create value through individualized usage practices (Vargo and Lusch 2004). The four projects in this proposed special session examine a broad range of usage practices that exemplify various manifestations of the emerging maker movement. Specifically, Akaka, Schau, and Vargo explore user innovation among surfers, Schau and Mars examine how makers vie for authenticity within local farmers’ markets, and Rindfleisch examines the phenomenon of desktop 3D printing. Kietzmann, Pitt and Robson examine the effect of this growing Maker Movement upon organizations by proposing and conceptualizing a new construct (i.e., Crowd Capital) that assesses a firm’s ability to integrate various types of user contributions. All four consider the cultural underpinnings and institutional structures that surround the maker movement. In addition to offering an expansive examination of various types of maker activities, these four projects employ a diverse array of conceptual and empirical approaches that will inspire important discussions of the social and economic impact of the maker movement. 

GlobalSIG: Contemporary Develments in Global Marketing Research​ 
Chair: Constantine S. Katsikeas, University of Leeds

Understanding the ambidexterity in product and market domains in the Internationalization process of emerging market firms—A case study of four Chinese firms 
Hui Xu, Nankai University; Shouren Xu, Yunnan University; Shaoming Zou, University of Missouri

The Stereotype Content Model (SCM) in Country-of-Origin (COO) Research: Measurement Issues 
Adamantios Diamantopoulos, University of Vienna; Arnd Florack, Professor, University of Vienna; Benjamin Serfas, University of Vienna

Exploitation, exploration, and adaptive export performance in turbulent times: The market and product development domains 
Ana Lisboa, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestão/Instituto Politécnico de Leiria; Dionysis Skarmeas, Athens University of Economics and Business

Drivers and Outcomes of International Marketing Strategy Fit: An Empirical investigation 
Magnus Hultman, University of Leeds; Constantine S. Katsikeas, University of Leeds

There is consensus that ever-increasing dynamic challenges to global marketing operations are redefining the nature of existence for internationally active firms. The challenges faced in establishing and developing international market operations have recently further intensified as a result of the global economic situation. This Global Marketing SIG Special Session addresses these challenges by providing novel strategic insights and presenting opportunities that can contribute to resolving international firms’ competitive tensions and ultimately improve international strategy making. The presentations in the Session address a range of timely global marketing issues such as internationalization among emerging market firms, country image operationalization, exploitation/exploration in international product development, and international marketing strategy fit. The presentations employ various theoretical perspectives, innovative methodologies, and involve collaborative research projects from academic institutions across the world. ​ 

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IOSIG: Empirical Challenges, Solutions and Opportunities in IO Research​

Panelists:
Rajdeep Grewal, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sandy Jap, Emory University
Robert Palmatier, University of Washington

Over the past few years, IOR researchers have faced several empirical challenges when conducting their research. On the one hand, getting survey respondents to collaborate in research projects has become increasingly difficult in a post-downsizing world where business executives are oversurveyed and have increasing responsibilities. At the same time, issues such as common method bias, usage of single versus multiple respondents, the challenges of cross-sectional versus longitudinal research, endogeneity biases, sample selection biases, all have come to prominence in the IOR review process at different points in time. While such potential biases are an important source of concern, they have also significantly raised the bar for the publication process. There is also evidence that young scholars and potential IOR students are increasingly apprehensive about the challenges they face when conducting IOR research. In many cases, this even discourages from pursuing IOR research altogether. In this special session, we invite prominent IOR scholars to discuss the most frequent empirical issues raised in the review process for IOR papers, possible courses of action to address these concerns, their experiences in the review process both as authors and reviewers, as well as their own approach to deal with these issues. The panelists will also discuss the potential benefits and challenges of new alternative research methods in the IOR area. 

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Panelists:
Stacey Menzel Baker, University of Wyoming
Clifford J. Shultz, II, Loyola University Chicago
Sonya Grier, American University
William L. Wilkie, University of Notre Dame
Ronald Paul Hill, Villanova University

This panel discussion, comprised of influential marketing ethics and public policy scholars, will explore predominant paradigms relevant to marketing and consumer research. The format will involve panelists making brief comments followed by open discussion centered on three themes: 1) theoretical advancements related to exploration of affluent versus impoverished socioeconomic populations; 2) languages of research and practice with potential to dehumanize individuals with whom marketers engage; and 3) paradigmatic constructs that limit consideration of systemic realities and challenges. Perspectives of these influential panelists can offer reflections on the marketing field’s evolution, and provide insights that look forward to inform future thinking.

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RelationshipSIG: Technology and Relationship Marketing: A Love-Hate Relationship​
Chair: Aberdeen Leila Borders, Kennesaw State University; Mona Sinha, Kennesaw State University

Panelists:
Jagdish Sheth, Emory University
George Milne, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
V. Kumar, Georgia State University

This panel will discuss the opportunities and challenges that technology poses for the field of relationship marketing and future steps for researchers and practitioners, while addressing the following questions:
- How can we find a balance between firms’ and customers’ needs with respect to relationship marketing technology tools?
- How can we re-gain customer trust to put the “mojo” back into Relationship Marketing?

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Retail & Pricing SIG: Digital and Interactive for Enhancing Customer​
Chair: Gopalkrishnan R. Iyer; Florida Atlantic University

Service Recovery in a Technological World
Krista Hill, Bridgewater State University; Dhruv Grewal, Babson College; Anne L. Roggeveen, Babson College

Keep it Real – The Magic of Online Shopping Experience
Stefanie Paluch, TU Dortmund University; Sarah Küsgen, TU Dortmund University; David Egbert, TU Dortmund University

Price Discrimination and its Role in the Acceptance of Self-Service Technologies
Sören Köcher, TU Dortmund University; Markus Blut, Newcastle University; Hartmut Holzmüller, TU Dortmund University; Gopalkrishnan R. Iyer, Florida Atlantic University

This special session, organized by the Retail and Pricing SIG, brings together a diverse group of researchers from Germany, UK and the USA to explore the impacts of technology in shaping customer expectations and experiences in retailing and services. Papers included in this special session explore the role of technology in service recovery, product presentation in online retailing and the impacts of pricing in acceptance of self-service technologies. Together, the papers offer new approaches and insights on how technology has affected the retailing and service environments. Each paper will also focus on managerial implications and offer suggestions for future research. 

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SalesSIG: Death of a Salesman: The Role of Today's B2B Salesperson From the Purchaser's Perspective​
Chair: Leff Bonney, Florida State University; Stacey Schetzsle, Ball State University

Panelists:
Ed Decarlo – Director of Procurement, Clear Chanel Communications
Jane Revel – Head of Technology and Information, Rackspace IT
Dave Simmons – Head of Operations, Laird Plastics

In this session, the Sales SIG membership as well as other attendees will explore the role of the sales person in the information age. This will be accomplished by a rare panel discussion that involves B-2-B purchasing staff who will share their insight on where the role of the sales person is heading.

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ServSIG: The Good and the Bad of Customer Contribution to Services: Traits, Expectations, and Perceptions​
Chair: Mohammad Ali Zolfagharian, University of Texas–Pan American

Dicussants: Audhesh K. Paswan, University of North Texas; Xiaojing Sheng, University of Texas–Pan American

Consumer Value Co-Creation: A Pathway for Measurement
Samaneh Torkzadeh, University of Texas–Pan American

Propensity to Participate: The Modifier in the Participation-Satisfaction Relationship
Jakob Braun, University of Texas–Pan American

Antecedents of Consumers' Corporate Social Responsibility Evaluations: Incorporating Consumer Expectations
Roberto Saldivar, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Patient Participation and Satisfaction: The Mediating Roles of Anxiety and Service Quality
Arash Hosseinzadeh, University of Texas–Pan American 

Although the positive effects of co-creation have been widely documented in services marketing literature, there has also been some documentation of negative outcomes. Given these conflicting findings, the goal of this session is to present papers that analyze salient relationships in the co-creation literature, test constructs that could help explain and predict the varied attitudinal and behavioral outcomes, and explore avenues for future work. The session is comprised of six papers that are separated into two sections titled: (1) Co-creation as a double-edged sword and possible constructs to help explain both edges, and (2) Looking towards the future: contexts and measurements for forthcoming research. The first paper in the special session is an empirical study published in the Journal of Services Marketing, all other papers in this session are working papers inspired by the principal study. The likely audience for this session includes researchers interested in services literature and specifically those researchers interested in co-creation literature.

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SportsSIG: Sports marketing and Sponsorship on the Global Stage​
Chair: Darin W. White, Samford University

Approaches to CRM and Database Marketing in Professional Sports
Russell Scibetti, Vice President of Product Strategy, KORE (New York Jets, former Director of Relationship & Database Marketing)

Is Sport Sponsorship Global? Evidence from the United States, the United Kingdom, and India
Noni Zaharia, University of Northern Colorado

Can You Hear Me Now? Assessing the Effects of Auditory Stimuli on Sponsorship Processing
Jonathan A. Jensen, The Ohio State University; Brian A. Turner, The Ohio State University; Joe Cobbs, Northern Kentucky University; Patrick Walsh, Syracuse University

Sponsorship of sports is an established marketing platform that has been the focus of hundreds of research papers to date. Increasingly firms are turning to sports sponsorship as they seek to grow their brand presence across the globe. Very little research has examined the unique challenges of implementing an effective sports sponsorship strategy across multiple countries. The importance of understanding the sponsorship platform cannot be overstated. PwC projects 4.8% sponsorship annual growth globally over the next three years, to $67.7 billion in 2017. Sponsorship spending now accounts for almost one out of every five dollars spent in advertising. This special session will seek to address some of the following pressing questions global sponsorship directors are concerned with: best practices in global return on investment for sports sponsorship, activation and leveraging, sponsorship portfolios, corporate social responsibility and sponsorship, social media and sponsorship activation on a global stage, corporate sponsorship global measurement and fan to brand transference via sponsorship.

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TeachingSIG: Teaching and Learning Creatively: Pedadgogical Innovations to Stimulate Intellectual Curiosity​
Chair: Victoria L. Crittenden, Babson College

Panelists:
Delancy Bennett, Clemson University
Colin Campbell, Kent State University
Richard Hanna, Babson College
Colleen Kirk, Mount Saint Mary College
Daniel Korschun, Drexel University
Felicia Lassk, Northeastern University
Andrew Rohm, Loyola Marymount University
Scott D. Swain, Clemson University
David Williams, Dalton State College

This special session for the Teaching and Learning SIG will capture the best-of-the-best in terms of educational innovations in marketing -- from course innovations to project innovations to process innovations. Ten panelists will focus on a specific innovative pedagogical tool for delivering innovative teaching. Each panelist will explain: (1) the innovation, (2) the deliverable for the innovation, and (3) the characteristics of the innovation that made it a successful pedagogical approach. This special session begins with three course innovations at Loyola Marymount University, Clemson University, and Mount Saint Mary College. Next, five project innovations used at Babson College, Dalton State College, Northeastern University, and Kent State University are described. The panel presentations conclude with examples of two process innovations in use at Drexel University. Details about each of the innovative creations will be provided so that audience members can use the innovative teaching techniques in their own classrooms. 

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DocSIG: Perfect Practices and Perils of Resarch Project Management​
Chair: Scott Cowley, Arizona State University

Panelists: 
Tom Brown, Oklahoma State University
Vanitha Swaminathan, University of Pittsburgh

The goal of this session is to provide doctoral students with accurate and applicable information to guide them in managing research projects. Doctoral coursework in marketing tends to emphasize theory development and research methods, but doctoral students frequently find themselves under-prepared for activities that constitute a large portion of research time: project management. This session highlights some best practices doctoral students can use (and pitfalls to avoid) in managing their research from inception to completion.

This special session will take three-level approach to addressing the topic.

(1) The research stage discussion of project management will highlight effective strategies for not only organizing aspects of the research process, but helping research to move forward at every stage of the process. Research always occupies a stage. In the beginning, doctoral students need to know what to do with research ideas and how to manage them through to project launch. Projects in theory development, literature review, data collection, writing, and submission stages all have stage-specific project management nuances that determine the progression or stagnation of research.

(2) The people discussion of project management will address strategies for managing the individual actors who are part of a research project. Doctoral students need to understand how to use effective “people skills” as researchers to ensure that the right people are on the project, doing the right things at the right time.

(3) The integration discussion of project management takes a more holistic view at how to achieve better balance and prioritization. As students progress in their careers, the number of competing demands and projects are likely to multiply. Students need to better understand how to approach their days and weeks with the right perspective to achieve a manageable sense of rhythm and purpose. 

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How and Why do Brands Impact Firm Performance and Create Value​
Chair: Lopo L. Rego, Indiana University

Assessing Firms' Brand Management Capabilities
Neil A. Morgan, Indiana University; Lopo L. Rego, Indiana University; Douglas W. Vorhies, University of Mississippi

Acquiring Portfolios of Brands, Customers, and Technology: When Do They Pay Off?
S. Cem Bahadir, Ozyegin University; Sundar G. Bharadwaj, University of Georgia

Brands and Firm Performance
Meike Eilert, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Satish Jayachandran, University of South Carolina; Neil Morgan, Indiana University 

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MASSIG: Marketing's Place in the Healthcare and Society Discussion: Challenges, Opportunities, and Agenda​
Chair: Matthew Sarkees, St. Joseph’s University

Panelists:
M. Paula Fitzgerald, West Virginia University
Craig Andrews, Marquette University
Matthew Sarkees, St. Joseph’s University;

The healthcare environment in the United States is undergoing dramatic changes. Traditional problems still haunt healthcare, even in new forms. For some businesses and consumers, the financial burden of medical care is too much. These dynamics create opportunities for significant academic contribution, particularly from a marketing perspective. The goal of this session is to inform and to encourage research through all methodological lenses with a purpose of pushing marketing to the forefront of healthcare discussions drawing on data and not politics. We use brief overviews on specific topics from panelists in the interest of generating discussion among the audience. 

This event has passed and is unavailable for registration.

​Conference Location: 

San Antonio Marriott RivercenterSan Antonio Marriott Rivercenter
101 Bowie Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
Phone: 1 210.223.1000
Reservations: 1 800.648.4462

A magnificent 38 story hotel directly on San Antonio's famed river walk, the San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter is steps away from diverse dining, shopping and entertainment. Featuring luxurious rooms and suites, guests will enjoy supreme comfort conveniently located near many area attractions, including Six Flags Fiesta Texas and the San Antonio Zoo. The Alamo, one of the nation's most storied and revered landmarks, is a short walk away. The hotel is designed for to stay connected with the outside world: with LCD TVs, premium cable, high-speed Internet access, and Marriott's Plug-In Technology in each guest room.​


Room Rates:

San Antonio Riverwalk

$189.00 single/double occupancy per night

Rates are subject to applicable state & local taxes, currently 16.75%, and 0.70% State Cost Recovery Fee per day (subject to change without notice)

Rates are based on availability.

Please reserve your overnight accommodations early as there are a limited number of AMA special rates available.
 

Reserve a Room Now

Or call the San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter at 1 800.648.4462 and ask for the American Marketing Association Winter Marketing Educators’ Conference room block.

The AMA's group reservation cut-off date is January 16, 2015.

The AMA has negotiated special group rates for the Winter Marketing Educators’ Conference. You must make your hotel reservations by January 16, 2015 and properly identify yourself (American Marketing Association Winter Marketing Educators’ Conference) to qualify for the special group rate, based on availability. After January 16, 2015, the rooms will be released for sale to the general public, and all reservations will be accepted on a space available basis at the hotel's available rate - not at the group rate. A credit card or deposit in the amount of (1) one night’s room & tax for each confirmed room will be due at time of booking. Cancellations made within 48 hours prior to your arrival & no-shows will forfeit the initial deposit. If you fail to arrive on your confirmed arrival date, your entire reservation will be cancelled and your credit card will be charged for one night’s room and tax.

Check in time is 4:00pm, and check out is at 12:00pm. Anyone arriving earlier than 4:00pm will be checked in as soon as a room(s) becomes available. Guests checking out early may be assessed an early departure fee. Upon check in, guests will be asked to verify their departure date. At that time, scheduled departure dates may be altered.

Hotel Features, Services & Accommodations
 

Please visit the San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter​ for a full list of services & features.

Area Attractions & Events 
Please visit the San Antonio Convention & Visitors Bureau for additional city information. 

Conference Attire  
Conference attire is business casual. Meeting rooms tend to be cool, so you may wish to bring a sweater/jacket.



The AMA is committed to providing equal access to our meetings for all attendees. If you are an attendee with a disability and require program accommodations, please contact the AMA Meeting Services Department, and a member of our staff will ensure that appropriate access arrangements are made. If you have specific disability related needs for your hotel sleeping room, please be sure to communicate those directly to the hotel when you make your reservation. In an effort to provide the highest quality of service to all attendees, we require that details of all access requests be communicated to our office at least 14 days in advance of the beginning of the meeting.


AMA Travel Program
American Marketing Association has partnered with Delta to provide our attendees a 2% - 10% discount for the Winter Marketing Educators’ Conference in San Antonio, TX. The Delta Meeting Network discount is based on the booking class of your ticket.

Reservations and ticketing are available by visiting Delta 
or by calling Delta Meeting Network Reservations at +1.800.328.1111. When booking online, select Book A Trip, click on Advanced Search and enter the meeting event code: NMKXL in the box provided on the Search Flights page.

Reservations may also be made by calling Delta Meeting reservations at +1.800.328.1111 Monday through Friday 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. CDT.
*Please note that a Direct Ticketing Charge will apply for booking by phone through the reservation number above.

Tower Travel Management
AMA's travel coordinator, Tower Travel Management, is available to assist with reservations. Call +1.800.542.9700 within the U.S. and Canada. Reservation lines are open Monday through Friday 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. CDT or, you may contact them via email at association@towertravel.com.  

T
ower Travel will proactively research airfares on ALL airline carriers to ensure that the lowest available fares are offered to all attendees. They are dedicated to providing superior customer service and hassle-free travel arrangements. Please note that fees, restrictions and cancellation penalties will apply.

Alamo Rent-A-Car
Drive Happy with Alamo. Where American Marketing Association members save up to 20%. And, with self-serve check-in you can skip the counter, check-in at the kiosk and drive away. All you need is a valid driver's license, major credit card and an existing reservation. It's that easy. Reserve a car now or call Alamo Rent A Car at 1 800.462.5266. Be sure to request Contract ID AMA7745 at the time of reservation.

Enterprise Rent-A-Car
Great Cars. Low Rates. Free Pick-up. 
When you’re ready to go, we make it easy with everyday low rates on great cars. With the largest fleet in North America and a wide variety of vehicles, Enterprise has you covered. Plus, we're always nearby at more than 6,000 neighborhood and airport locations. Reserve a car now.
Pick-up and drop-off service is subject to geographic and other restrictions.

National Car Rental
As an American Marketing Association member, you'll get up to 20% off rentals at National Car Rental. And, with the Emerald Club® from National Car Rental, you can bypass the counter and choose your own car. Enroll now
Reserve a car or call National Car Rental at 1 800.CAR.RENT® and reference Contract ID AMA7745 at the time of reservation. Go National. Go Like a Pro.

Directions
From San Antonio International Airport – SAT
Driving Directions (8 miles):
Take 281 South to Commerce St Exit. Make a right at the light (Commerce) and continue down 1 block. Hotel is on the right hand side, at the corner of Bowie and Commerce.

Estimated taxi fare: $22.00 (one way) 

Airport Shuttle Service (Operated by GO Airport Shuttle)
GO Airport Shuttle provides airport transportation to and from the San Antonio International Airport. Please visit GO Airport Shuttle for more information or call 1 844.787.1670.   
Approximate fare: $19.25 one-way (subject to change without notice)

Parking at the Hotel
The hotel offers self and valet parking. Self-parking is $27.00 plus tax per day. Valet parking is $37.00 plus tax per day. Rates are subject to change without notice. Onsite parking is limited and the garage cannot accommodate oversized vehicles. 

Sponsor & Exhibit Contact​​

 

To learn more about AMA Event Sponsorship opportunities, please contact Lore Gil at lgil@ama.org or call 312.542.9033.

 

 

 

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Academic Teaching Tool Sponsor

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Case Centre

Market Motive 

 

SABRE


 

 
 
 
 

 Stukent Internet Marketing Boot Camp

 
 

 Benefits of Attending

 
  • Hear from some of marketing academia’s key thought leaders in compelling special sessions 

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  • Gain exposure to cutting-edge research from a diverse array of scholars. 

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  • ​Establish and deepen relationships with your peers in networking breaks, receptions, awards luncheon and other events.

 

 Future Conferences

 

2016 Winter AMA - Las Vegas 
  26-28 February
2017 Winter AMA - Orlando
  17-19 February
2018 Winter AMA - TBD
  February

 

 Past Conferences

 

2014 Winter AMA​ - Orlando, FL 
2013 Winter AMA - Las Vegas, NV 
2012 Winter AMA - St. Petersburg, FL 
2011 Winter AMA - New Orleans, LA