Call for Papers: Winter AMA 2017

Submissions now closed, stay tuned for full conference program details: located here  
 

Better Marketing for a Better World

Throughout the world, marketers are helping consumers improve their lives, firms prosper, and societies function better. Yet as research in marketing has become more specialized, the field has become more splintered, and academic work has too often become detached from the most important challenges facing the world today. There are many conferences these days, but few scholarly events offer a "big tent" to bring together researchers who pursue very different approaches to the study of important marketing phenomena.

The 2017 Winter AMA conference will be a step toward creating this big tent. The conference seeks to draw exciting, high-quality research from across the marketing academic community, and will highlight the diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches that represent the field. Rather than featuring traditional tracks, the conference will feature ten cross-cutting themes that are phenomenon-focused. The focus of the conference on a “better world” puts the emphasis on a broad set of firm, consumer, policy, and market level outcomes that are important to the future of marketing.

The Winter AMA 2017 conference is co-chaired by Rajesh Chandy, London Business School, Jeff Inman, University of Pittsburgh, and Christine Moorman, Duke University. A full list of conference themes along with information on the submission process is contained in this call for papers.


2017 Winter AMA Poster Co-Chairs

Tom Brown, Oklahoma State University

June Cotte, University of Western Ontario


 2017 Winter AMA Associate Editors

Michelle Andrews​, Emory University​

Yakov Bart, Northeastern University

Bryan Bollinger, Duke Univeristy

Adam Brasel, Boston College

Deepa Chandrasekaran, University of Texas - San Antonio

Anna Shaojie Cui, University of Illinois Chicago

Amber Epp, University of Wisconsin

Frank Germann, University of Notre Dame

Kelly Geyskens, Maastricht University

Katrijn Gielens, University of North Carolina

Kelly Hewett​, University of Tennessee

Kelly Haws, Vanderbilt University

Sam Hui, University of Houston

Son Lam, University of Georgia

Leonard Lee, NUS Business School

Arul Mishra, University of Utah

​Gina Mohr, Colorado State University


Cele Otnes, University of Illinois

Koen Pauwels, Ozyegin University

Andrew Petersen, Pennsylvania State University

Anne Roggeveen, Babson College


Gaia Rubera, Bocconi University

Martin Schreier, Vienna University of Economics and Business

Nancy Sirianni, University of Alabama

Ashish Sood, University of California - Riverside

David Schweidel, Emory University 

Raji Srinivasan, University of Texas

Michael Trusov, University of Maryland

Kapil Tuli, Singapore Management University

Yanwen Wang, University of Colorado

Jan Wieseke, Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Call For Papers (Now Closed - Submission Deadline was August 27th, 2016): 

Program Submission Options​
Competitive Papers || Posters || Pecha Kucha || Special Sessions || Videos


Conference Themes


​Code of Ethics

Authors submitting papers to American Marketing Association academic conferences must adhere to the following code of ethics​:​

  • Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) manuscript, special session proposal, or working paper abstract to multiple tracks is not permitted.
  • Submitting authors should specify who will present papers being considered for Special Sessions or Competitive Paper presentations. An author can be listed as a presenter for no more than two submissions, but can be listed as co-author on multiple submissions. This restriction is to encourage authors to submit their best work and to allow a wider range of presenters.
  • Submissions should not already be published in any journal or publication (including online journals, books and book chapters. Submitting authors should monitor this issue carefully.
  • Competitive Paper and Poster submissions should not include content that has been presented at earlier AMA conferences.
  • Submissions must adhere to the recommended formatting and page limits.

 


Submission Requirements, Policies and Procedures

All submissions should be made electronically via the AMA's online submission management system (Abstract Central). Visit http://amawinter17.abstractcentral.com for additional instructions. If you have submitted to an AMA academic conference in the last year, you should be able to use the same username and password. The deadline for submission is August 27, 2016.   


Competitive Papers 

Manuscripts addressing substantive or theoretical topics are sought for competitive paper sessions.

It is mandatory that at least one author of all accepted papers register for (a​nd present the paper at) the conference. Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) manuscript(s) to multiple tracks is not permitted. As a reminder, papers are reviewed following a double-blind process; reviewers will not who authored the papers, nor will authors know the names of their reviewers.

Format & Style for Competitive Papers:

Prepare and submit electronic documents in Microsoft Word. Submitted papers - including references, exhibits, and appendices - must not exceed 20 double-spaced, word-processed pages prepared in 12-point font and a standard one-inch margin. Papers that exceed this limit will be rejected. 

In addition to the manuscript, please prepare brief descriptions clearly stating your (1) Research Question, (2) Method & Data used (not applicable for non-empirical papers), (3) Summary of Findings, and (4) Key Contributions. This should not be included in the same document with the manuscript; rather, these descriptions will be pasted in the appropriate spaces during the online submission process. Should you have any questions, please contact Lynn Brown-Reyes, program manager at lreyes@ama.org

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities in the body or reference section of the paper. Authors should do the following:

  • Do not include a front page with author-identifying information.

  • Remove author identifying information from the document’s file properties. In Word, this can be done by using/clicking on the “Properties” feature (use Word’s Help resource for further details on how to use it).

At the time of submission via Abstract Central, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your paper was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Authors of accepted competitive papers have the option of publishing either an extended abstract or full paper in the conference proceedings. Choosing to publish an Extended Abstract gives authors the option to submit the paper elsewhere for publication after the conference​.​​  

Posters​ 

Poster sessions provide an opportunity to share research in the working stage, i.e., with at least part of the data having been collected and analyzed, but not necessarily ready for submission to a journal They are presented as part of poster sessions. Poster sessions can be particularly useful for getting input at intermediate stages of a research project.

By submitting a working paper abstract, the author affirms that he/she will register for and appear at the conference to participate in the poster session. Please note that poster abstracts are not included in the Conference Proceedings.

Format & Style for Posters:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format.  Working paper submissions must include the title and an extended abstract of 1200-1500 words plus selected references. The abstract should summarize the research, including the conceptual framework, description of the method, data, results, and conclusions. No tables or figures should be included in the abstract.

The text of the working paper abstract must not exceed 1500 words and should be submitted in double-spaced format, prepared in 12-point font.

In addition to the manuscript, please prepare brief descriptions clearly stating your (1) Research Question, (2) Method & Data used (not applicable for non-empirical papers), (3) Summary of Findings, and (4) Key Contributions. This should not be included in the same document with the manuscript; rather, these descriptions will be pasted in the appropriate spaces during the online submission process.​ Should you have any questions, please contact Lynn Brown-Reyes at lreyes@ama.org. ​

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities in the body or reference section of the paper. Authors should do the following:

  • Do not include a front page with author-identifying information.

  • Remove author identifying information from the document’s file properties. In Word, this can be done by using/clicking on the “Properties” feature (use Word’s Help resource for further details on how to use it). 

At the time of submission via Abstract Central, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your abstract was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Accepted working paper authors must agree to prepare a poster for display during the session and be available to discuss your research and answer questions during the invited poster session​.​​​


Pecha Kucha​

Pecha Kucha presentations contributing to marketing practice, theory, or pedagogy are solicited. 

Pecha Kucha presentations consist of exactly 20 sides. Each slide must be on the screen for 20 seconds. Thus, each presentation lasts exactly 6 minutes and 40 seconds.   

Authors may work together and create Pecha Kucha special sessions with numerous Pecha Kucha presentations organized around a given topic. These sessions should be submitted as a special session proposal.

Format & Style for Pecha Kucha Submissions:

Prepare and submit electronic documents in Microsoft PowerPoint or software that can produce slide decks readable in full in PowerPoint. Submitted Pecha Kucha presentations - including any title slide - must be exactly 20 slides. Any submissions not containing exactly 20 slides will be rejected.

In addition to the slides themselves, please prepare a synopsis of what you intend to say during the slide show. The synopsis should be between 1 to 4 sentences per slide.

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities on any slide or in the PowerPoint document information panel (the "Info" entry under the "File" menu option or its equivalent "Properties" in older versions of PowerPoint). Should you have any questions, please contact Lynn Brown-Reyes, Live Experience Manager at lreyes@ama.org. 

At the time of submission via Abstract Central, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number, and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your Pecha Kucha presentation was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Note that accepted Pecha Kucha presentations will not be included in the conference proceedings.

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Videos

Videos contributing to marketing practice, theory, or pedagogy are solicited.

It is mandatory that at least one author of all accepted videos register for (and be present for the showing at) the conference. Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) video(s) to multiple tracks is not permitted. Videos will be reviewed following a single-blind process; authors will not know the names of their reviewers. 

Details for Submitting Video:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format. Submissions must include the title and a text abstract of less than 1200 words (plus selected references if any).  Submit as a special session and inlcude link to your video in the abstract.  The abstract itself should summarize the video. No tables or figures should be included in the abstract.

Important Note: With a video submission, please also send the link or video file to Lynn Brown-Reyes, Live Experience Manager. Submitted videos should be between 8 and 10 minutes in length. Videos will be judged on their contribution to marketing theory, practice, or pedagogy. In addition, reviewers, and Track Chairs may judge submissions on entertainment and production value. 

At the time of submission via Abstract Central, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.



Special Sessions​

These sessions are intended to provide opportunities for focused attention to critical topics. In order to promote discussion between participants and the audience from which a larger understanding of the topic can emerge, special topic session organizers should have a chair or discussion leader that is an expert in the area. Creative mechanisms for encouraging and managing discussion, besides the traditional discussion leader/chair, are welcome, but must be described in the session proposal. A discussant is not required for special sessions.

Special sessions can take various formats. Given the “big tent” focus of the conference, special sessions that bring scholars from different traditions together are especially welcome. For example, a session may feature 3-4 papers and a discussant on a related theme. Another possibility is an interactive panel discussion among several experts. Other creative special session formats are encouraged, particularly those that generate attendee interaction. These might begin with 3-4 Pecha Kucha presentations and lead to an audience discussion of a particular marketing topic. Special session papers are not included in the Conference Proceedings.

The conference does not include a formal SIG track since there are likely to be many opportunities for SIG members to engage with the themes of the conference. SIG members are welcome to interpret the themes broadly, and drive the field in a direction they think is important and interesting for the conference.  If the existing themes are too much of a stretch for your special session, we invite you to submit under the “Other Topic” category.   Submissions in the “Other Topic” category are welcome and will receive just as much consideration as submissions that fit existing themes. The big tent is big! ​

Format & Style for Special Sessions:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format.  Special topic session proposals must include the title of the session and an extended abstract of 2000 words. The proposal should describe the objective of the session, its structure and general orientation, likely audience, key issues, and topics to be covered, as well as a description of why the session is likely to make an important contribution to the discipline. If the session involves multiple papers, include brief descriptions for each paper.

The text of the Special topic session proposal must not exceed 2000 words and should be submitted in double-spaced format, prepared in 12-point font. Please prepare a separate description not exceeding 100 words. This should not be included in the proposal itself but will be pasted in the appropriate space during the submission process via Abstract Central.

At the time of submission via the online system, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all presenters including name, mailing address, phone number, fax number, and e-mail as it should appear in the final program materials. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Due to the unique nature of special sessions, presenter names and information should be included in the proposal and will be noted as a part of the review process.

Confirmation that your proposal was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.​​ Special session participants are all expected to register for the conference.

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Conference Theme Descriptions

1.    Driving positive consumer welfare

Welfare can be understood from an economic, psychological, or social perspective and can be a product of individual and collective consumer behaviors as well as consumers’ interactions with firms. How and under what conditions can firms do well by doing good? Examples include marketing to the bottom of the pyramid, marketing to create environmental and societal outcomes, and marketing in a manner that is mindful of customers’ well-being. How can charitable donations, recycling, and other positive consumer behaviors be encouraged? ​​How can firms create value by simultaneously making consumers better off (i.e., create win-win outcomes)? What are the long-term consequences for firms that focus on extracting short-term consumer surplus (e.g., dynamic pricing)? How do marketing leaders foster organizational capabilities or cultures that drive positive consumer welfare? How should policy approach this issue as it balances the needs of firms and the needs of customers?

​2. Connecting for good: mobile, digital, social

The explosion of new ways of reaching and interacting with customers holds enormous opportunity for marketing. However, the area is rife with controversy with limited research to guide consumers, marketers, and policy. How can marketers use these new tools individually or collectively most effectively to create value for their customers and capture value for their firms? How can digital marketing be employed to benefit consumers and society? How can privacy concerns with location-based marketing be overcome? How can data from mobile devices or social media be more effective in generating useful insights for consumers and firms? What interventions or nudges via mobile devices and social media are most effective? What is the consumer’s lived experience of the new digital marketing frontier? How do consumers navigate this new world and how does the use of these tools affect their interactions with firms and one another? Field studies using mobile or social media are particularly welcome.

3. Improving the customer journey and services experiences

The customer journey (CJ) has been disrupted by technology, creating firm and consumer opportunities. What is the nature of that journey in different channels and in an omni-channel environment? At the same time, the field is taking a broader look at the topic of customer experience and how it can facilitate customer satisfaction and important firm outcomes. This is especially important in the services domain where experience is often at the core of the service. What is the interplay between the CJ and the customer experience (CX)? How can a firm identify the most effective CJ touchpoints to focus their CX efforts? Is CX at firm-driven touchpoints less impactful than CX at customer-driven touchpoints? How is CX different from CRM? What is the role of technology in the CX domain? Measurement and construct operationalization of key stages and outcomes in the CJ-CX process are sorely needed. Insights are also needed regarding how firms can most effectively manage the CJ and create the CX. What firm capabilities and organizational structure are most important to getting the job done well? 

4. Innovation for good: impact, sustainability, and scale

Innovation is an important source of progress for nations and firms. It can save lives, save time, delight, and extend our interactions in the marketplace in important ways. Managing innovation requires balancing risk and reward and developing new capabilities for developing and leveraging new products, services, and ideas in new markets. How do innovations affect consumers, companies, or societies? How can policy be used as a tool for stimulating innovation? What organizational approaches are most effect in guiding the most important innovations for society? What marketing knowledge and skills prepare marketers to be better innovators? Why are some more successful in penetrating society and creating markets than others? On the consumer side, how do consumers navigate a world of so many innovations? Novel insights on the drivers of innovation, the role of innovation among understudied populations, and the impact of innovation on consumers, firms, and society are especially welcome. 

5. Change and dynamics in marketing

The study of change and dynamics in markets is fundamental to marketing. Consumers and firms are dynamic actors that change in response to one another. What important dynamics have not been documented in marketing? What insight is derived from revealing how consumers, firms, and markets evolve over time? On the modeling front, new empirical approaches to improve our understanding of how customers are changing over time are welcome. There is also a need for models that precisely capture shifts in marketing effectiveness over time has never been greater. How can such shifts best be estimated? Can data science play a role in helping firms identify trends in time to react? How can dynamic models be used to generate prescriptions for firm actions? How can concerns about endogeneity be reasonably dealt with? The time seems right for more collaboration between modelers and experimentalists—how can this be fostered? 

6. Metrics for making marketing matter

Calls for metrics abound in the discipline. As tools of evaluation and accountability, marketing metrics have taken their position in the pantheon of effective marketing. Investments, strategy change, and even marketing leaders hang in the balance of how marketing performs on key metrics. The marketing-finance interface has brought a new set of metrics and associated questions for the field to consider as we seek to improve marketing’s influence on stock market outcomes. At the same time, metrics for intangible marketing activities remain a challenge as do metrics for marketing’s effect on non-economic outcomes. Metrics should make marketing matter in companies but why are metrics so often ignored and to what end? On the academic side, what are the right metrics to evaluate the quality of academic research? 

7. Better food, health, and nutrition

This theme addresses food, health and nutrition from a wide range of perspectives. Consumer decision making and consumption behaviors are critically important given rising obesity and increasing morbidity, as well as the opportunity to improve human life through better decisions and behaviors. The institutional structures and market activities that give rise to food, health, and nutrition activities are also of interest, including access to nutritious food and health care. The supply side of marketing practice is a dominant force affecting health and wellness. We welcome insights into improving food marketing practices, debates on the value and ethics of marketing activities, and the need for and effectiveness of public policy to stimulate either consumer or marketer activities. Field studies that test potential interventions to drive healthier choices or reduce caloric intake are particularly welcome. 

8. Communities and collaborations with customers and partners

Communities of customers and networks of partners set the stage for a profoundly complex and interesting marketplace. This theme addresses this topic from the perspective of both consumers and firms, from a psychological, social, and economic perspective, and from a micro, dyadic, social network, and social structure perspective. These communities and collaborations may exist under the purview of marketing or they may arise independently. Either way, marketing plays a key role in firms in fashioning these critically important relationships, networks, and collectives. Networks of partnerships are being woven together to create new forms of competitive advantage. These new forms require complex governance approaches with consideration of relational factors and transaction costs. How will the threat of disintermediation transform long-time partnerships? New concepts and new methods are welcome for this enduring topic in the marketing profession.

9. Managing human capital for better marketing and sales

Human capital—as manifested in the knowledge, abilities, experience, judgment, and connections of individuals—is crucial to the success and failure of marketing and sales. Improved human capital among consumers, employees, leaders, and entrepreneurs can mean better outcomes for themselves as well as those with whom they interact. What is the best way to develop and leverage human capital for the most effective and inspiring interactions? What environmental, organizational, and business factors influence improvements in human capital? The field needs a better understanding of this “people” side of marketing. 

10. Marketing and consumption around the world 

This theme welcomes research on the role and nature of marketing in international contexts. Taking the perspective of customers, firms, markets, institutions, and policy, this topic is rife with opportunity. What is the nature of consumer behavior across markets? How do customers perceive and interact with a global marketplace? How do firms approach the challenge of marketing across markets? How do they manage the desire to build scalable, global resources and capabilities that can be adapted for local markets? What is the nature of marketing in non-traditional locations? What is the impact of marketing (and marketers) around the world? Insights from emerging or understudied markets are especially welcome, as are insights from novel approaches to the study of marketing and consumption around the world.​


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 2017 Conference Chairs

 
Rajesh Chandy

Tony and Maureen Wheeler Chair in Entrepreneurship
​London Business School

Jeff Inman

Associate Dean for Research and Faculty
Albert Wesley Frey Professor of Marketing and Professor of Business Administration​
University of Pittsburgh

Christine Moorman

T. Austin Finch Professor, Sr. of Business Administration​
Duke University 

 

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