2019 Advanced School of Marketing Research

Atlanta, GA

Monday, November 4

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Qualitative Research Tools

Much emphasis has been recently placed on the future of qualitative research in the online sphere — e.g., on online communities and consumer boards. However, traditional qualitative research methods — e.g., focus groups and in-depth interviews (IDIs) — still play a fundamental role in providing powerful and meaningful insights. This session is focused on understanding the foundations and purpose of qualitative research, current trends, the trade-offs associated with qualitative research, and the breadth of online and offline tools that qualitative researchers can leverage to generate powerful and actionable insights. We will also explore the following issues in qualitative research:

  • ​What skills are required of qualitative researchers?
  • What are the most important components of a qualitative research discussion guide, and how would this apply to various research tools?
  • How is social media influencing qualitative research?
  • How can my company use research communities?

Candice R. Hollenbeck, Ph.D.

Faculty, Marketing Department, University of Georgia

10:00 am - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Qualitative Research Tools (Continued)

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Lunch

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Online Research Development

Online research is now one of the most commonly used tools in the marketing researcher’s toolkit, but in recent years a great deal of change has occurred in this important area. We will explore some of the opportunities and risks associated with emerging tools, such as mobile-based data collection, and will address some of the current challenges to the effective use of Web surveys. We will also tackle one of the biggest concerns facing the research community: declining data quality from fraudulent, professional and/or fatigued members of online panels. We examine not only the magnitude of this problem, but will also discuss the most effective methods for combatting it. Other topics covered in this session include current trends in online research, the latest techniques and technologies for data collection (such as Prediction Markets), and the use of non-conscious measurement in an online environment. The session will also discuss some best practices in the design and deployment of online surveys.

Jeff Miller

President & CEO, Burke, Inc.

2:45 pm - 3:15 pm

Break

3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Social Media Research

This session will take a deeper dive into qualitative research, focusing specifically on social media, online communities, and virtual platforms. The emphasis will be on demonstrating how these tools are being used by qualitative research professionals to support data collection and enhance the ability to reach their target audience to support better decision making. The discussion will include an emphasis on the fundamental skills and knowledge needed to appropriately apply these next-generation tools and will specifically address:

  • ​How social media networks are being used for research purposes including secondary research
  • Social media and virtual tools which are available
  • Emerging technologies allowing us to engage differently with consumers

Kendall Nash

Vice President, Qualitative Research Services, Burke, Inc.

Tuesday, November 5

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Conjoint Analysis and Discrete Choice

Marketing researchers have increasingly turned to conjoint and discrete choice experiments to address questions about product and price optimization and strategy. Fundamental to these techniques is the plan for running the study, which is called the experimental design. The purpose of the first half of this session is to provide a practitioner-oriented introduction to experimental designs for conjoint and discrete choice analysis. The session will cover how designs are created and assessed.  Real-world examples will be presented, and interactive class exercises will be included. The second half of the session will extend coverage of conjoint and discrete choice by presenting modeling and estimation techniques. The discussion will include traditional procedures, latent class and hierarchical Bayesian methods, maximum difference scaling (MaxDiff), and recent developments. Real world examples will be presented, and interactive class exercises will be included. Coverage will include modeling and model estimation, market simulators, and interpreting results.

John C. Wurst, Ph.D.

President, Atlanta Marketing Sciences Consulting, and faculty, Marketing Department, University of Georgia

10:00 am - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Conjoint Analysis and Discrete Choice (Continued)

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Lunch

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Behavioral Economics and Research

Traditional methods of market research have had their effectiveness challenged recently because many believe that such methods may not accurately capture actual consumer behavior. Behavioral Economics, along with other implicit behavior methods, has been proposed as a tool to close this gap between stated behavior and actual behavior as it provides researchers with a set of prescriptive rules that help to predict behavior under different conditions. In this session, we will discuss the underpinnings of behavioral economics, describe a series of heuristics and biases, and discuss the implications of these seemingly irrational behaviors for consumer insights.

Marcus Cunha Jr., Ph.D.

Professor of Marketing, University of Georgia

2:45 pm - 3:15 pm

Break

3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Behavioral Economics and Research (Continued)

Wednesday, November 6

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Pricing Research

Pricing is one area of marketing research that can always demonstrate its ROI. Methods of pricing research can help add incremental sales, prop up unit volume, or pad the bottom line.  Unfortunately, there are a lot of ways to gather information to inform pricing decisions, and they vary in terms of the degree of insight and forecasting accuracy they provide. This session will provide an overview of the most popular methods including monadic tests, the von Westendorp Price Sensitivity Meter and its variants, and discrete choice modeling. The session will use real-world examples to highlight the pros and cons of these methods, and will end with a primer on practical considerations on choosing the right method and best practices in setting up the research.

Rob Arnett

Rob Arnett, Executive Vice President, M/A/R/C Research

10:00 am - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Measuring Brand Equity

Brand equity is an important component of successful marketing performance. This session will examine currently used methods of determining and measuring brand equity and will deep dive into why certain practices are more effective than others.   The specific elements of brand equity models will be examined to determine which elements are most important and why. The session will compare and contrast traditional and more cutting edge models to demonstrate which model is best in a given scenario. Case studies demonstrating how and when to use the equity models will be shared.

Christopher Murphy

Chief Client Officer, Kantar North America

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Lunch

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

New Product Development

Creating insight is a crucial part of new product development, and the tools we cover throughout this week put us in good stead for developing such insight. Still, it is widely reported that 9 out of every 10 new products launched fail (just take a look at TV show cast-offs)! We will discuss why this is the case and provide a framework to increase the chances of new product success.  The breakdown is largely due to an inability to turn true insight into foresight – a lack of attaching an insight to competitive landscape end states and the changes likely to take place. While truly finding a need and filling it is certainly one path to success, human motivations short of needs such as simple wants and desires are often overlooked as potential territories for development. Instead of just asking “what’s not working” or “what could work better,” we can and should structure inquiry around aspirations as well. We will review best-in-class research techniques associated with new product development such as needs gap analysis, feature optimization, concept testing, demand forecasting, scenario assessment, and strategic opportunity mapping. We will show how judicious use of these techniques can help ensure that the “good” is not sacrificed in pursuit of “the perfect” and incremental solutions are successfully implemented.

Walter Blotkamp

Vice President MMR Research Associates

2:45 pm - 3:15 pm

Break

3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

New Product Development (Continued)

Thursday, November 7

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Making Brain Science Pragmatic

This session will focus on understanding consumers’ non-conscious and emotional motivation.  It comes as no surprise to hear that consumers are not always thorough, rational decision makers. In fact, research shows that we are able to make all kinds of decisions-from evaluating someone’s trustworthiness to deciding if the price of soda is good or bad-without conscious consideration. So how do we make sense of all of this and, as importantly, how should it impact our research approaches?

Swann will present a framework, based on decades of academic research, to understand how consumers’ non-conscious and emotional motivations impact their decisions. By the end of this session, you will understand why emotions and non-conscious motivations are important, when they are most likely to impact consumers, and how to impact consumers’ emotional and non-conscious motivations.

He will also discuss the tools available to measure these motivations, helping you to choose the right approaches for your business objectives.

Charles Swann

Vice President, Lieberman Research Worldwide

10:00 am - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Making Brain Science Pragmatic (Continued)

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Lunch

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Leveraging Online Search Trend Data in Marketing Research

This session will demonstrate how researchers can leverage online search trend data as a powerful source of market intelligence. The first half will focus on how to extract and process historical search trend/volume data from Google Trends and Google AdWords Keyword Planner, including topics such as:

  • How to identify popular search queries on a topic (e.g., brand, product, attribute, event)
  • How to gather historical search trend/volume data by topic, time period (e.g., year, month, week, day, hour, minute) and market (e.g., country, state, city, DMA)
  • How to decompose historical search trend data into seasonal, short- and long-term components

Rex Du, Ph.D.

Professor of Marketing at the Bauer College of Business, University of Houston

2:45 pm - 3:15 pm

Break

3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Leveraging Online Search Trend Data in Marketing Research (Continued)

The second half will consist of several use cases, illustrating a wide range of applications of online search data in marketing research, for example:

  • Identify common ‘macro trends’ hidden behind the search trends for a large number of brands/products
  • Decompose the impact of advertising into interest generation vs. conversion
  • Use product feature search trends as indicators of feature importance trends in market mix modeling
  • Use co-searches of brands/products to uncover and monitor market structure
  • Analyze minute by minute brand search data to assess the effectiveness of TV ad spots

Evening Reception

Friday, November 8

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Information Visualization

Data visualization is more than just a concept; it’s a critical skill that can be learned. In an industry where so much of the information being reported is numbers-based, being an effective visual communicator is essential to creating impactful, engaging reports. Do you know the one essential question to ask before approaching any visualization? Learn this and specific techniques for choosing the most appropriate method of displaying data, as well as how to clear the clutter and use visual cues to guide your reader through a report. The session will also provide strategies for dealing with qualitative/text-heavy research and inspire creativity with suggestions for working with color and imagery, providing a broad look at the many aspects of information visualization. An interactive group activity will challenge participants to identify best practices, while real-world before & after examples will demonstrate those best practices in action.

Kristen Downs

Graphics Specialist, MMR Research Associates

10:00 am - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Information Visualization (Continued)

Boxed Lunch