Call for Papers: 2019 AMA Winter Academic Conference

Markus Giesler, Son Lam, Xueming Luo
Academic
Current average rating    
Key Takeaways

​Conference Theme:
Understanding Complexity,
Transforming the Marketplace


The marketplace has become increasingly smarter and complex. However, marketing research on these issues is fragmented and constrained by existing frameworks and theories. Consistent with the ‘big tent’ philosophy of bringing together researchers who study marketing-related phenomena using various approaches, the 2019 Winter AMA conference seeks to attract exciting, rigorous research that is truly multidisciplinary and methodologically diverse. The focus of the conference on the issues of ‘understanding complexity’ and ‘transforming the marketplace’ underscores the importance of unpacking emergent marketing processes by a close examination of their complexity and identification of ways to transform the marketplace into a better world. To that end, creative applications and development of new methods and theories are welcome.

The Winter AMA 2019 conference is co-chaired by Son K. Lam, University of Georgia, Markus Giesler, York University, and Xueming Luo, Temple University. A full list of conference themes along with information on the submission process is contained in this call for papers. 

All submissions will be made with a theme code and a method code. Reviewers with expertise in that theme and method will evaluate and make a recommendation regarding the submission. These recommendations will be sent to a select group of Associate Editors (AEs) that will make editorial decisions on each submission. The Conference Chairs will assemble the final program based upon these recommendations. 
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Conference Themes and Associate Editors

 
       Associate EditorsNicole Coleman, University of Pittsburgh and Kirk Kristofferson, Western               University
 
       Associate Editors: Stacey Finkelstein, Stony Brook University and Julio Sevilla, University of Georgia
 
       Associate EditorsAnindita Chakravarty, University of Georgia & Mahima Hada, Baruch College
 
      Associate Editors: J. Andrew Petersen, Penn State University & Farnoosh Khodakarami, Michigan         State University
 
      Associate Editors: Shuili Du, University of New Hampshire and Tarun Kushwaha, University              of North Carolina at Chapel Hill​
 
      Associate Editors:​ Felipe Thomaz, Oxford University & Stefan Wuyts, Koc University
 
      Associate Editors:​ Yiping Song, Fudan University

       Associate Editors: Zach Hall, Texas Christian University & Jessica Ogilvie, Marquette University
 
       Associate EditorsMichel van der Borgh, Copenhagen Business School & Jenny van Doorn,                   University of Groningen
 
        Associate Editors: Alan Malter, University of Illinois at Chicago and Ela Veresiu, York University
 
        Associate EditorsSascha Raithel, Free University Berlin & Xi Chen, Erasmus University
 
        Associate Editors: Davide Proserpio, USC Marshall & Navdeep Sahni, Stanford University

        Associate EditorsLin Boldt, University of Central Florida & Hongju Liu, Universtiy of Connecticut
 
        Associate Editors: Gokcen Coskuner-Balli, Chapman University and Amber Epp, University of           Wisconsin-Madison 
 
15.   SIG Programming
​        Monica Gerhardt, American Marketing Association

AMA Pre-Conference: Women in Marketing 
Co-chair: Punam Keller (Tuck School of Business) and Anat Keinan (Harvard Business School)

Poster Session
Associate Editor: Hua Chen
Assistant Professor in Marketing
University of Georgia
huachen@uga.edu

Special Sessions
Special Sessions (Friday afternoon) – In collaboration with the Santa Fe Institute

Complexity Theory – A Sample of Applications
Session Chair: Will Tracy, the Santa Fe Institute

Complexity Theory – A Multidisciplinary Discourse
Session Chair: to be determined.

Special Sessions (Saturday)

Connecting with Practitioners
Session Chair: Adam Rapp 
The Ralph and Luci Schey Associate Professor of Sales
Ohio University, College of Business
rappa@ohio.edu

Best Practices in Managing Centers
Session Chair: Charlotte Mason 
Terry Professor of Marketing
University of Georgia, Terry College of Business
cmason@uga.edu 

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Submission Guidelines and General Information


​Code of Ethics
Authors submitting papers to American Marketing Association academic conferences must adhere to the following code of ethics: 

  • Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) manuscript, special session proposal, or working paper abstract to multiple themes is not permitted.
  • Submitting authors should specify who will present papers being considered for Special Sessions or Competitive Paper presentations. An author can be listed as a presenter for no more than two submissions, but can be listed as co-author on multiple submissions. This restriction is to encourage authors to submit their best work and to allow a wider range of presenters.
  • Submissions should not already be published in any journal or publication (including online journals, books and book chapters). Submitting authors should monitor this issue carefully.
  • Competitive Paper and Poster submissions should not include content that has been presented at earlier AMA conferences.

Submissions must adhere to the recommended formatting and page limits.

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Submission Types


All submissions should be made electronically via the AMA's online submission management system (Abstract Central). Visit [website] for additional instructions. If you have submitted to an AMA academic conference in the last year, you should be able to use the same username and password. The deadline for submission is August 23, 2018.     

Competitive Papers 

Manuscripts addressing substantive or theoretical topics are sought for competitive paper sessions.

It is mandatory that at least one author of all accepted papers register for, and present the paper at, the conference. Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) manuscript(s) to multiple themes is not permitted. As a reminder, papers are reviewed following a double-blind process; reviewers will not know who authored the papers, nor will authors know the names of their reviewers.

Format and Style for Competitive Papers:

Prepare and submit electronic documents in Microsoft Word with text of up to 3,600 words (approximately 6 pages) for review; references do not count against the word limit. Authors also have the option of including one table summarizing results and/or one figure (these also do not count against the word limit). [Please note that submissions with text longer than 3,600 words will not be reviewed].

In addition to the manuscript, please prepare brief descriptions clearly stating your (1) Research Question, (2) Method and Data used (not applicable for non-empirical papers), (3) Key Contributions to the academy (marketing discipline) and the practice (marketers and managers), and (4) Summary of Findings. This should not be included in the same document with the manuscript; rather, these descriptions will be pasted in the appropriate spaces during the online submission process.  

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities in the body or reference section of the paper. Authors should do the following:
  • Do not include a front page with author-identifying information.
  • Remove author identifying information from the document’s file properties. In Word, this can be done by using/clicking on the “Properties” feature (use Word’s Help resource for further details on how to use it).
At the time of submission via Abstract Central, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your paper was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Authors of accepted competitive papers have the option of publishing either an extended abstract or a full paper in the conference proceedings. Choosing to publish an Extended Abstract gives authors the option to submit the paper elsewhere for publication after the conference.   



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Poster sessions provide an opportunity to share research in the working stage, i.e., with at least part of the data having been collected and analyzed, but not necessarily ready for submission to a journal They are presented as part of poster sessions. Poster sessions can be particularly useful for getting input at intermediate stages of a research project. All poster abstract submissions must be directed to only one theme. (See details about themes below).

By submitting a poster abstract, the author affirms that he/she will register for and appear at the conference to participate in the poster session.

Format and Submission Process for Posters:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format.  Poster submissions must include the title and an extended abstract of 750-1000 words plus selected references. The abstract should summarize the research, including the conceptual framework, description of the method, data, results, and conclusions. Authors also have the option of including one table summarizing results and/or one figure (these also do not count against the word limit).

In addition to the manuscript, please prepare brief descriptions clearly stating your (1) Research Question, (2) Method and Data used (not applicable for non-empirical papers), (3) Key Contributions, and (4) Summary of Findings. This should not be included in the same document with the manuscript; rather, these descriptions will be pasted in the appropriate spaces during the online submission process.  

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities in the body or reference section of the paper. Authors should do the following:
  • Do not include a front page with author-identifying information.
  • Remove author identifying information from the document’s file properties. In Word, this can be done by using/clicking on the “Properties” feature (use Word’s Help resource for further details on how to use it). 
At the time of submission via Abstract Central,​ the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your abstract was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Accepted poster authors must agree to prepare a poster for display during the session and be available to discuss your research and answer questions during the invited poster session.

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Anyone may organize and propose a special session, although those who are unfamiliar with AMA conference special sessions are encouraged to discuss their ideas with the conference co-chairs for developmental feedback before submitting a proposal.  Special sessions provide a good vehicle to acquaint marketing academics with new perspectives, theories, and provocative ideas, to bring diverse participants together around a common theme, or to integrate academically-minded practitioners into the conference. Sessions involving participants from multiple countries, focusing on theory development or cutting-edge research directions, and offering insights regarding academic-business partnerships for teaching or research are particularly encouraged. 

Special sessions should feature three or four presentations on a related theme. Another possibility is an interactive panel discussion among 4-6 panelists and a moderator. Other creative special session formats are encouraged, particularly those that generate attendee interaction. 

All special session proposal submissions must be directed to only one theme(see details about themes below). Proposals for special sessions should describe the topic and its importance to marketing, summarize the issues to be covered, and identify all individuals (with their qualifications) who will formally participate. Special session proposals should provide specificity regarding the purpose, format, participants, and roles in the session. AMA Academic Special Interest Groups (SIGs) may propose special sessions to the SIG Programming Theme. 

Selection criteria include the general quality of the proposal, the level of interest the session is likely to generate at the conference, and the session’s relevance to the conference theme.

By submitting a special session proposal, the organizer and listed participants affirm that, if accepted, all will register for and appear at the Conference as described in the proposal. 

Format and Submission Process for Special Sessions:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format.  Special session proposals must include the title of the session and an extended abstract of 3600 words maximum. The proposal should describe the objective of the session, its structure and general orientation, likely audience, key issues, and topics to be covered, as well as a description of why the session is likely to make an important contribution to the discipline. Also include a brief description of each paper in the session.

The text of the special session proposal must not exceed 3600 words and should be submitted in double-spaced format, prepared in 12-point font. Please prepare a separate description not exceeding 100 words. This should not be included in the proposal itself but will be pasted in the appropriate space during the submission process via Abstract Central.

At the time of submission via the online system, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all presenters including name, affiliation, phone number, and e-mail as it should appear in the final program materials. ​

Due to the unique nature of special sessions, presenter names and information should be included in the proposal and will be noted as a part of the review process.

Confirmation that your proposal was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter. Special session participants are all expected to register for the conference.

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Conference Theme Descriptions


Associate Editors: Nicole Coleman, University of Pittsburgh and Kirk Kristofferson, Western University

Complexity is the study of intricate systems, ones which depend on the interactions of multiple factors: consumer behavior is thus rooted in complexity. This track will feature research that offers insight into consumers’ behavioral and psychological responses to the marketing environment. As such, it is open to a variety of topics and research questions. For example, research may offer insight into the adoption and usage of new smart technologies (e.g., mobile/wearables, home devices), and how these technologies may enhance or hinder social connection, influence, or identity. It may also look at consumer motivation and emotion. Other important topics are consumer learning, motivation, memory, and information use, price perception, prosocial behavior, branding, consumer culture theory, and the influence of individual differences (e.g., ethnicity, income, religion, age, education) on consumer behavior. These are a few examples, but the track is not limited to these topics and is open to any method and findings that shed light on how consumers behave. 


Associate Editors: Stacey Finkelstein, Stony Brook University and Julio Sevilla, University of Georgia

Today, more than ever, marketing academics are working on issues that are socially meaningful andworking on issues that are socially meaningful and impactful. There’s been continued interest in understanding how enhancing accessibility to, and subsequently choice of, nutritious foods and healthcare enhances well-being and burgeoning interest in understanding privacy concerns in a digital age. Additionally, many of us are exploring ways of enhancing well-being for at-risk or vulnerable groups, including children, youth, the elderly, those recovering from natural disasters, and those who have typically been under-represented in the marketplace. We encourage submissions from a breadth of methodological approaches and perspectives. 


Associate Editors:​ Anindita Chakravarty, University of Georgia and Mahima Hada, Baruch College

This track welcomes research that considers various aspects of inter-firm exchange as well as competition. Such research might investigate the dynamics of inter-firm relationships and how such relationships are being affected by technology, process and product innovation, information exchange via networks and social media. All contexts such as supplier-buyer, multiple channels, strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, strategic groups, platforms involving multiple buyers and sellers, inter-organizational networks are applicable. Research priorities include: What are some of the new ways that firms use inter-firm exchanges to improve their own marketing effectiveness? What are some of the new ways in which firms are managing the classical cooperation versus friction dynamic in their transactions with other firms? What are some of the ways in which firms allocate marketing budgets effectively in complex environments such as multiple channels or platforms? How are firms using their networks to facilitate their own marketing effectiveness? What metrics of performance should firms consider as they assess their relationships with other firms?


Associate Editors: J. Andrew Petersen, Penn State and Farnoosh Khodakarami, Michigan State University

This track welcomes all research that looks to better understand the relationships between firms and customers with an end goal of increasing customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, and/or customer advocacy. Typical research areas include, but are not limited to, customer experiences (e.g., the design, delivery, and management of the customer experience through the customer journey), customer engagement (e.g., customer advocacy (WOM), customer recommendations, customer reviews), and customer relationship management (e.g., customer metrics, customer loyalty, customer relationships, marketing communication strategies).


Associate Editors: Shuili Du, University of New Hampshire and Tarun Kushwaha, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

In today’s highly competitive and turbulent environment, marketing managers face greater pressure from the stakeholders and society to justify their actions. Lawmakers expect greater accountability and transparency, investors expect higher return on marketing investment, customers demand better quality products and services, and citizens expect greater social responsibility. In this track, we invite papers that address firms’ relationships with their various stakeholders, with a specific focus on firm level implications. The suggested topics include, but are not limited to, marketing-finance interface, product failure, impact of media coverage, role of politics, corporate social responsibility, green marketing, social movements, consumer protests, employee union strikes, and other public policy related topics.


Associate Editor: Felipe Thomaz, Oxford University and Stefan Wuyts​, Koc University

Understanding and managing complexity. Organizing for innovation in an interconnected world. Omnichannel presence and strategies. Managing intrafirm relationships and networks. These ideas have quickly raced from sources of distinctive advantage to “table stakes,” or baseline activities to operate successful marketing firms in today’s world. But, doing so successfully still requires a significant level of firm agility, integration, and capability building.  How do firms then move from just taming complexity, to successfully leveraging it to form novel and winning marketing strategies? This track invites research that considers marketing strategies around developing, managing, and leveraging intrafirm relationships. And, in keeping with the conference theme of “Understanding Complexity, Transforming the Marketplace,” research and special sessions focused on the transformative, and world-betterment aspects of this challenge are particularly welcome. Manuscripts can be conceptual or empirical.


Associate Editors: Yiping Song, Fudan University

This track invites papers that focus on emerging business models with new technologies and address complex marketing issues with new insights. In line with the conference theme, papers dealing with understanding of fundamental customer behavior differences in the emerging business models, drivers and performance outcomes of marketing strategies in unexplored territory, and papers examining new methods to disentangle marketing effectiveness in the existing marketplaces. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following: emerging business models, customer welfare and marketing effectiveness in the digital age, marketing with new technologies, customer relationship in the dynamic marketing context, omnichannel shopping and marketing, marketing applications in virtual reality and augmented reality, new marketing analytics metrics, cryptocurrency and mobile payment, and machine learning/artificial intelligence applications in marketing. 


Associate Editors: Zach Hall, Texas Christian University and Jessica Ogilvie, Marquette University

With heightened customer expectations and an increasingly complex marketplace, the sales function and the professional selling role are vital to organizational success. Following the conference theme of “Understanding Complexity and Transforming the Marketplace” this track invites papers and special session proposals that address issues related to professional selling and sales management in an increasingly complex global marketplace.  We encourage submissions that explore the role of the sales function in relation to (1) understanding and addressing complexities of human and organizational behavior in the sales process, (2) exploring the increasingly crucial role of sales in the customer experience, (3) identifying ways in which selling and sales management are transforming the marketplace and economic exchanges within it, (4) the growing influence of smart technologies, social networks, digital tools, and mobile platforms in frontline interactions, and (5) applying novel sales methodologies and theories for enhancing customer satisfaction and sales performance. This track welcomes both conceptual and empirical work that offers meaningful implications for personal selling and sales management theory and practice. 


Associate Editors: Michel van der Borgh, Copenhagen Business School and Jenny van Doorn, University of Groningen

Services are becoming an important topic in both daily live and academic research disrupting the meaning of companies and consumers, and the value-creating interactions of these and other stakeholders. The track welcomes submissions on a wide range of service related and cross-functional topics, including service marketing, service management, service science, service innovation, service operations, service human resources, service information technology, technologies in services marketing, service design, and transformative services. In particular, the track invites submissions on topics from the following representative but not exclusive list: B2B service and solution selling, service process analytics, AI in services, social media & interactive service channels, service design, transformative services, healthcare services, B2B servitization, and service ecosystems. We encourage conceptual, empirical, and analytical work.​


Associate Editors: Alan Malter, University of Illinois at Chicago and Ela Veresiu, York University

This inclusive track aims to paint a clearer picture of what marketing and consumption look like in every corner of the world. This track invites papers that focus on consumers, firms, institutions, policy makers, cultures, or whole market systems from different parts of the globe. Research on international/global marketing issues and emerging markets is especially welcome. All methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives are very much appreciated. Some questions guiding this track include (but are not limited to): How do contemporary consumers think, feel, and/or act in different places? How do customer experiences vary based on culture? How are markets created, maintained, changed, or dissolved in different geographical locations? How do policies influence marketing decisions and vice versa in different parts of the world? What are some pressing international marketing and globalization issues facing us today? How do various actors approach the challenges of marketing and consuming in today’s global marketplace?


Associate Editors: Sascha Raithel, Free University Berlin and Xi Chen, Erasmus University

Computational marketing, big data analytics, deep learning, machine learning, marketing engineering, and algorithmic marketing are a few buzz words which describe advanced methods to deal with large amounts of structured (e.g., scanner, online and mobile tracking data) and unstructured data (e.g., text, images, voice, video) on opinions and behaviors of consumers at an unprecedented scale, granularity and speed. To improve marketing research and practices in current data-rich environment, this track draws on advances in affiliated disciplines such as computer science, statistics and econometrics. We welcome papers which introduce new methodologies of big data analytics useful for marketing academics and/or practitioners. We are open to a broad selection of methods, including but not limited to machine learning, text analysis, linguistics computing, image processing and data visualization.      


Associate Editors: Davide Proserpio, USC Marshall and Navdeep Sahni, Stanford University  

A critical challenge in any causal analysis is estimating the counterfactual, i.e., predicting what would have happened in the market, in the absence of the treatment.  The gold standard is running controlled field experiments; however, experimentation is not always possible. Because of this and the increasing availability of data, a large and growing body of marketing research is being dedicated to causal inference using observational data. This track is soliciting papers on field experiments, and causal inference using other methods. These other methods can range from econometric methods (natural experiments, regression discontinuity, or instrumental variable among others) to newer methods based on machine learning techniques that can credibly estimate causal inference effects.


Associate Editors: Lin Boldt, University of Central Florida and Hongju Liu, University of Connecticut

Marketing is a dynamic process. Marketing measures are often targeted at stimulating, reducing, or utilizing the dynamics in market responsiveness. We welcome topics that uncover the effects of marketing actions and policies on short-term performance and on long-term performance, e.g., dynamics in consumer learning, brand and corporate equity, customer relationship, or market response. We welcome methodologies in the intersection of marketing, economics, statistics and computer science that model dynamic marketing phenomena involving dynamic outcomes, actions, or processes (e.g., Bayesian learning, dynamic structural models, Hidden Markov models, time-series approaches, dynamic competitive games, or machine learning algorithm optimization).


Associate Editors: Gokcen Coskuner-Balli, Chapman University and Amber Epp, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Innovations, global flows, and shifts in economic and political structures have opened up the marketing field to new concepts and theories. To account for such complexity, the interdisciplinary foundations of consumer culture theory – “a family of theoretical perspectives that address the dynamic relationships between consumer actions, the marketplace, and cultural meanings” (Arnould and Thompson 2005) – can offer unique contributions to marketing theory and practice. Building on this year’s conference theme, we ask: What socio-cultural conditions shape how firms manage complexity? How do identity politics (e.g., related to gender, ethnicity, political ideology) drive, maintain, or constrain brand management or organizational strategies? What relational configurations and market actors matter as firms deal with technological, political, or economic disruptions? This track welcomes inventive empirical and conceptual papers and special session proposals that either uncover new streams of culturally-oriented marketing thought or enrich existing theory on institutional complexity, identity politics, cultural innovation, social practices, assemblages, market (co)creation and evolution, or consumer culture.


15.     SIG Programming
AMA Support provided by: Monica Gerhardt, Manager of Integrated Academic Content

SIG leaders are invited to coordinate the development and submission of a SIG-sponsored special session proposal. Any SIG desiring to sponsor a session on the conference program must submit a complete and valid special session proposal by the stated deadline to the SIG Track, following the general instructions for special session proposals.

Author Bio:

 
Markus Giesler, Son Lam, Xueming Luo
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