Call for Papers: 2018 AMA Winter Academic Conference

Juliano Laran, Andrew Stephen, Jacob Goldenberg
Academic
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Key Takeaways

Integrating Paradigms in a World Where Marketing is Everywhere​

 

Bringing together perspectives, approaches, and even fields that are outside marketing but studying what we also study (such as computer science). Marketing touches everything these days and the marketing discipline can take more ownership of this.

This theme continues our trend of creating a “big tent” space where marketing scholars from across the discipline come together. It recognizes that marketing is both influencing (and being influenced by) a diverse set of forces from across the business world and academe. This also presents opportunities to engage the world of practice where marketing departments are taking on more complex roles and collaborations.


A full list of conference themes along with information on the submission process is contained in this call for papersThe 2018 AMA Winter Academic Conference is co-chaired by:

 stephenAndrew Stephen, University of Oxford

 laranJuliano Laran, University of Miami

  jgoldenbergJacob Goldenberg, IDC Herzliya


Call For Papers - Submission Deadline is August 23rd, 2017

Program Submission Options

Competitive Papers || Posters​​ || Special Sessions || SIG Programming


Conference Themes and Associate Editors

 
 
Kelly Herd, Indiana University
Caglar Irmak, University of Miami
 
 
Julio Sevilla, University of Georgia
Dipayan Biswas, University of South Florida
 
 
Brent McFerran, Simon Fraser University
Keith Wilcox, Columbia Business School
 
 
Zoey Chen, University of Miami
Beth Fossen, Indiana University
 
 
Marcus Cunha, University of Georgia
Vamsi Kanuri, University of Miami
 
 
Anja Lambrecht, London Business School
Caroline Weirtz, Cass Business School
 
 
Eric Schwartz, University of Michigan
Felipe Thomaz, University of South Carolina
 
 
Isaac Dinner, University of North Carolina
Peter Zubcsek, Tel Aviv University
 
 
Ashish Sood, University of California Riverside
 
 
Abhishek Borah, University of Washington
Laura Kornish, University of Colorado Boulder
 
 
Cammy Crolic, University of Oxford
Rhonda Hadi, University of Oxford
 
 
Sertan Kabadayi, Fordham University
Linda Nasr, Texas State University


 
Gal Ostreicher-Singer, Tel Aviv University
Gordon Burtch, University of Minnesota
 
 
Son Lam, University of Georgia
Michel van der Borgh, Eindhoven University of Technology
 
15.   SIG Programming

Monica Gerhardt, American Marketing Association
 


Other Activities and Associate Editors

 
1. Posters / working papers
 
Yakov Bart, Northeastern University
Alan Malter, University of Illinois at Chicago
 
2. Doctoral symposium
 
Michelle Andrews, Emory University
Kristina Durante, Rutgers University
 
3. Early career symposium
 
Aner Sela, University of Florida
Michael Braun, Southern Methodist University


 

 ​Code of Ethics

Authors submitting papers to American Marketing Association academic conferences must adhere to the following code of ethics: 

  • Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) manuscript, special session proposal, or working paper abstract to multiple themes is not permitted.
  • Submitting authors should specify who will present papers being considered for Special Sessions or Competitive Paper presentations. An author can be listed as a presenter for no more than two submissions, but can be listed as co-author on multiple submissions. This restriction is to encourage authors to submit their best work and to allow a wider range of presenters.
  • Submissions should not already be published in any journal or publication (including online journals, books and book chapters). Submitting authors should monitor this issue carefully.
  • Competitive Paper and Poster submissions should not include content that has been presented at earlier AMA conferences.
  • Submissions must adhere to the recommended formatting and page limits.

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Submission Requirements, Policies and Procedures

All submissions should be made electronically via the AMA's online submission management system (Abstract Central). Visit http://amawinter18.abstractcentral.com for additional instructions. If you have submitted to an AMA academic conference in the last year, you should be able to use the same username and password. The deadline for submission is August 23, 2017.   


Competitive Papers 

Manuscripts addressing substantive or theoretical topics are sought for competitive paper sessions.

It is mandatory that at least one author of all accepted papers register for, and present the paper at, the conference. Submission of the same (or substantially overlapping) manuscript(s) to multiple themes is not permitted. As a reminder, papers are reviewed following a double-blind process; reviewers will not know who authored the papers, nor will authors know the names of their reviewers.

Format and Style for Competitive Papers:

Prepare and submit electronic documents in Microsoft Word with text of up to 3,600 words (approximately 6 pages) for review; references do not count against the word limit. Authors also have the option of including one table summarizing results and/or one figure (these also do not count against the word limit). [Please note that submissions with text longer than 3,600 words will not be reviewed].

In addition to the manuscript, please prepare brief descriptions clearly stating your (1) Research Question, (2) Method and Data used (not applicable for non-empirical papers), (3) Key Contributions to the academy (marketing discipline) and the practice (marketers and managers), and (4) Summary of Findings. This should not be included in the same document with the manuscript; rather, these descriptions will be pasted in the appropriate spaces during the online submission process.  

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities in the body or reference section of the paper. Authors should do the following:

  • Do not include a front page with author-identifying information.
  • Remove author identifying information from the document’s file properties. In Word, this can be done by using/clicking on the “Properties” feature (use Word’s Help resource for further details on how to use it).

At the time of submission via Abstract Central, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your paper was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Authors of accepted competitive papers have the option of publishing either an extended abstract or a full paper in the conference proceedings. Choosing to publish an Extended Abstract gives authors the option to submit the paper elsewhere for publication after the conference.   

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Posters ​

Poster sessions provide an opportunity to share research in the working stage, i.e., with at least part of the data having been collected and analyzed, but not necessarily ready for submission to a journal They are presented as part of poster sessions. Poster sessions can be particularly useful for getting input at intermediate stages of a research project. All poster abstract submissions must be directed to only one theme. (See details about themes below).

By submitting a poster abstract, the author affirms that he/she will register for and appear at the conference to participate in the poster session.

Format and Submission Process for Posters:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format.  Poster submissions must include the title and an extended abstract of 750-1000 words plus selected references. The abstract should summarize the research, including the conceptual framework, description of the method, data, results, and conclusions. Authors also have the option of including one table summarizing results and/or one figure (these also do not count against the word limit).

In addition to the manuscript, please prepare brief descriptions clearly stating your (1) Research Question, (2) Method and Data used (not applicable for non-empirical papers), (3) Key Contributions, and (4) Summary of Findings. This should not be included in the same document with the manuscript; rather, these descriptions will be pasted in the appropriate spaces during the online submission process.  

To assure a blind review, authors must avoid revealing their identities in the body or reference section of the paper. Authors should do the following:

  • Do not include a front page with author-identifying information.
  • Remove author identifying information from the document’s file properties. In Word, this can be done by using/clicking on the “Properties” feature (use Word’s Help resource for further details on how to use it). 

At the time of submission via Abstract Central,​ the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all authors including name, mailing address, phone number and e-mail. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Confirmation that your abstract was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter.

Accepted poster authors must agree to prepare a poster for display during the session and be available to discuss your research and answer questions during the invited poster session.

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Anyone may organize and propose a special session, although those who are unfamiliar with AMA conference special sessions are encouraged to discuss their ideas with the conference co-chairs for developmental feedback before submitting a proposal.  Special sessions provide a good vehicle to acquaint marketing academics with new perspectives, theories, and provocative ideas, to bring diverse participants together around a common theme, or to integrate academically-minded practitioners into the conference. Sessions involving participants from multiple countries, focusing on theory development or cutting-edge research directions, and offering insights regarding academic-business partnerships for teaching or research are particularly encouraged. 

Special sessions should feature three or four presentations on a related theme. Another possibility is an interactive panel discussion among 4-6 panelists and a moderator. Other creative special session formats are encouraged, particularly those that generate attendee interaction. 

All special session proposal submissions must be directed to only one theme(see details about themes below). Proposals for special sessions should describe the topic and its importance to marketing, summarize the issues to be covered, and identify all individuals (with their qualifications) who will formally participate. Special session proposals should provide specificity regarding the purpose, format, participants, and roles in the session. AMA Academic Special Interest Groups (SIGs) may propose special sessions to the SIG Programming Theme. 

Selection criteria include the general quality of the proposal, the level of interest the session is likely to generate at the conference, and the session’s relevance to the conference theme.

By submitting a special session proposal, the organizer and listed participants affirm that, if accepted, all will register for and appear at the Conference as described in the proposal. 

Format and Submission Process for Special Sessions:

Prepare and submit an extended abstract in Microsoft Word format.  Special session proposals must include the title of the session and an extended abstract of 3600 words maximum. The proposal should describe the objective of the session, its structure and general orientation, likely audience, key issues, and topics to be covered, as well as a description of why the session is likely to make an important contribution to the discipline. Also include a brief description of each paper in the session.

The text of the special session proposal must not exceed 3600 words and should be submitted in double-spaced format, prepared in 12-point font. Please prepare a separate description not exceeding 100 words. This should not be included in the proposal itself but will be pasted in the appropriate space during the submission process via Abstract Central.

At the time of submission via the online system, the submitter will be asked to provide complete contact information for all presenters including name, mailing address, phone number, fax number, and e-mail as it should appear in the final program materials. All details, including the physical mailing addresses, are required.

Due to the unique nature of special sessions, presenter names and information should be included in the proposal and will be noted as a part of the review process.

Confirmation that your proposal was submitted successfully will be sent via e-mail to the submitter. Special session participants are all expected to register for the conference.

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Conference Theme Descriptions


1.    Consumer Behavior

Associate Editors: Kelly Herd, Indiana University and Caglar Irmak, University of Miami

This theme will feature research that offers insight into how consumers behave and how firms can better understand this behavior. As such, it is open to many different angles of investigation. As examples, research may offer insights into how to handle the increasing amount of debt consumers acquire by investigating financial decision making. It may also look at consumer motivation and emotion. Other important topics are adoption of technology, consumer learning, memory, and information use, price perception, branding, consumer culture theory, and the influence of individual differences (e.g., ethnicity, income, religion, age, education) on consumer behavior. These are a few examples, but the theme is not limited to these examples and is open to any method and findings that can shed light on how consumers behave.



Associate Editors: Julio Sevilla, University of Georgia and Dipayan Biswas, University of South Florida

This theme will feature research on how marketing and consumers behave around the world. Submissions may include the perspective of customers, firms, markets, institutions, and policy. Insights from emerging or understudied markets are especially welcome, as well as insights from novel approaches to the study of marketing and consumption around the world. How do consumers behave in different countries? How does consumption vary based on culture? How does marketing work in non-traditional locations? How do firms approach the challenge of marketing across markets? How do they manage the desire to build scalable, global resources and capabilities that can be adapted for local markets? What is the impact of marketing around the world?

3.    Better Food, Health, and Nutrition

Associate Editors: Brent McFerran, Simon Fraser University and Keith Wilcox, Columbia Business School

This theme will feature research on food, health, and nutrition from a wide range of perspectives. As such, it offers many opportunities. Given the obesity crisis, research that addresses the harmful consequences of consumption is welcome, including opportunities to improve quality of life through better decisions and behaviors. The supply side of marketing practice is a dominant force affecting health and wellness. Thus, market activities and configurations that give rise to better food, health, and nutrition activities are also of interest, including access to nutritious food and health care. We welcome debate on the value and ethics of marketing activities, and the need for and effectiveness of public policy to stimulate these activities. We welcome both field and lab studies that test potential interventions to drive healthier choices or reduce caloric intake.

Associate Editors: Zoey Chen, University of Miami and Beth Fossen, Indiana University

Studying social media and the digital consumer offers enormous opportunities for marketing. Still, this area is underexplored and presents several challenges that can be addressed with research. How can data from mobile devices or social media generate useful insights for consumers and firms? How can digital marketing be employed to benefit consumers and society? How much information are consumers willing to provide to firms? Can interaction with mobile devices ever replace human interaction? How can privacy concerns be overcome? What are consumers’ actual experiences with mobile devices and in the online world in general? How can we make better use of social media data? Surveys, lab studies, and field studies using mobile or social media are welcome.

5.     Advertising and Communications

Associate Editors: Marcus Cunha, University of Georgia and Vamsi Kanuri, University of Miami

This theme welcomes research on the impact of advertising and marketing communication on consumers. Have consumers evolved in terms of how they understand and cope with persuasion attempts? Are there new insights into the role of involvement in advertising processing and responses? What are the differences in effectiveness between advertising that occurs online and offline? How can firms better allocate resources to new advertising formats vs. traditional ones? Are there policy issues associated with advertising to children? Can children benefit from marketing communications or are marketing communications mostly harmful? How can firms develop ads that are customized to a consumer’s needs but still not cross a line and invade people’s privacy? The theme is broad in nature, therefore it is open to any method and insight into how firms and consumers develop and respond to advertising and marketing communications in general.

6.     Field Experiments

Associate Editors: Anja Lambrecht, London Business School and Caroline Weirtz, Cass Business School

An increasingly important approach to research in marketing, as well as other fields in the social sciences, is to use field experiments – either on their own or in conjunction with the other methods, such as lab experiments and analysis of secondary/archival data. This theme welcomes papers that use field experiments, as well as papers on running field experiments and related methodological considerations. When should field experiments be used? What are their limitations? How can researchers identify opportunities for conducting field experiments, and manage these undertakings? How can field experiments fit into a multi-method package of studies so that they complement (and are complemented by) other methods, such as lab/online experiments?


7.     Digitized Markets and Ecommerce


Digital marketing and ecommerce has become a mainstream topic within marketing, and this theme welcomes research that examines important issues in this broad area. Additionally, research that “pushes the envelope” by considering newer, emerging issues within this space is particularly encouraged (e.g., new types of digital platforms, new digitized consumer behaviors). How should marketers approach new(er) digital channels and ecommerce retail? What are some of the challenges and how can they be addressed? What types of customer data are generated and how can these be used? How is consumer behavior affected in these contexts?

8.     Marketing Analytics, Metrics, and Performance

Associate Editors: Isaac Dinner, University of North Carolina and Peter Zubcsek, Tel Aviv University

This theme welcomes research that considers issues at the heart of the ongoing debate in academia and practice around marketing effectiveness and ROI. Research that helps understand when, why, and how marketing actions are effective and efficient is pertinent to this theme. Work that uses analytics in smart, innovative ways to help establish marketing ROI is particularly relevant. What are some new ways of thinking about measuring marketing performance? Are there new metrics that marketers should consider and, if so, why? Which advanced analytics methods (e.g., from machine learning, statistics) are applicable to and relevant for addressing questions about marketing effectiveness? How can marketing budget allocations be made more efficiently in complex, multi-channel environments?

9.     Customer Engagement


Generating customer engagement is an often-mentioned marketing objective, but the concept of “engagement” itself is still somewhat poorly understood and vague. This theme welcomes research on customer engagement that helps understand what engagement actually is, and its antecedents and consequences. In particular, research that considers the multi-faceted nature of customer engagement from various perspectives is encouraged. What does it mean for a customer to be engaged with a firm? What is “meaningful” engagement and how can it be created? What are the downstream consequences of high levels of customer engagement? How can customer journey management and customer experience management be used to increase customer engagement in valuable ways?

10.     Innovation
Associate Editors: Abhishek Borah, University of Washington and Laura Kornish, University of Colorado Boulder

Innovation is essential for long-term marketing success, and much research in marketing over the years has focused on various aspects of product and service innovation processes. This theme welcomes new research that examines such issues, as well as work that expands our view of marketing innovation to include, for example, innovation-related issues that go beyond new product development. What is the role of innovation in improving marketing processes? How can marketing organization and leadership approaches be more innovative? How can customers be involved in innovation processes, including ideation and crowdsourcing initiatives? What ideas exist in other disciplines related to innovation (e.g., engineering) that could be successfully applied to marketing?


11.     Marketing, Wellbeing, and Healthcare

Associate Editors: Cammy Crolic, University of Oxford and Rhonda Hadi, University of Oxford


This theme welcomes research on marketing’s relationship to wellbeing and health. A focus on health sciences and how marketing is related and can make a difference is particularly important. Some relevant issues can be business healthcare models, consumer (patients) choice and decision making, food consumption behavior and nutrition choices, issues related to marketing’s influence on individual wellbeing, doctor/physician decision making, the effect of regulations, firm level policy, intervention policies that improve healthiness, drugs and medical equipment R&D management and policy, health insurance, financial aspect of R&D, healthcare innovation, privacy and methods how the textual information on the web can be used to promote healthcare issues.

12.    Service Research
Associate Editors: Sertan Kabadayi, Fordham University and Linda Nasr, Texas State University


T
he theme welcomes submissions on a wide range of service related and cross-functional topics, including service marketing, service management, service science, service innovation, service operations, service human resources, service information technology, technology and e-service, service design and transformative service. In particular, the theme invites submissions on topics from the following representative but not exclusive list: customer experience, service ecosystem, service innovation and technology, service leadership and culture, service recovery and complaint management, service strategy, healthcare services, financial services, social media & interactive service channels, theoretical perspectives on service, and other topics related to service. We encourage conceptual, empirical, and analytical work.


13.    Big Data: When Marketing Meets Computer Science

Associate Editors: Gal Ostreicher-Singer, Tel Aviv University and Gordon Burtch, University of Minnesota 

The colossal amount of data that has descended on the field of marketing created an irreversible change:  Marketing, IS and Computer Science fields are moving towards each other and they already have many meeting points in practice and theory. These are no longer remote fields; research problems in mobile and digital marketing are addressed by scholars from both fields. This theme will feature research on methods (e.g. deep learning, machine learning), as well as data science and big data use to develop new insights. One of the recent development is that we face data that include structured data (e.g., numerical data) as well as unstructured data, such as text, audio, or even video. The size of the data, and the new type of data (unstructured) require interdisciplinary effort in devolving new models. We welcome presentations by scholar from the three fields that focus on both statistical challenges as well as computation development.  In addition, phenomenon papers that uncover effects that can’t be spotted with regular types of data can fit well this theme.

 

14.    Sales, Leadership, and Human Resources

Associate Editors: Son Lam, University of Georgia​ and Michel van der Borgh, Eindhoven University of Technology

Even in the digital era, the human factor makes a big difference. This theme is devoted to human capital, and how to build and manage effective marketing and sales operations. The topics can revolve around employees satisfaction and how it is influences marketing and sales, empowerment of sales force, how the digital space shapes the nature of personal communication with customers,  how it may influence the leadership role, what are the ways to leverage human capital for the most effective and inspiring interactions, the environmental organizational, and business factors influence  improvements in human capital. In addition, this theme welcomes discussions on how the demand for managers who possess new type of skills to allow daily understanding of machine learning and deep learning procedures that applied on big data outputs should (or should not) change the education system.


15.   SIG Programming

AMA Academic Special Interest Groups (SIGs) may propose special sessions to the SIG Programming Theme. Proposals for these sessions should follow the same general requirements as Special Sessions. They should describe the topic and its importance to marketing, with an emphasis on why the issues in this session should be particularly relevant to SIG members, summarize the issues to be covered, and identify specific individuals (with their qualifications) who will participate. Specificity in the proposal is important. Proposals linking the special session to the conference theme (Innovation and Integrating Paradigms in a World Where Marketing is Everywhere​) are especially encouraged. Selection criteria include the quality of the proposal, the level of interest the session is likely to generate at the conference, specificity of details provided, and the session’s relevance to the conference theme.


Author Bio:

 
Juliano Laran, Andrew Stephen, Jacob Goldenberg
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