Call for Manuscripts: Marketing & Public Policy in a Technology-Integrated Society

Matt Weingarden, Curator
Academic
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Key Takeaways

​What? Data Authenticity and Quality Drives Decision-­Making Value Information is at the heart of decision-­making by consumers, firms, and government. Its authenticity and value drives the effectiveness of thoughts, feelings, and actions.

So What? How will the availability, access to, and quality of information that is influenced by technology impact a variety of core marketing issues, such as the exchange of products, consumer well-­‐‑being, and the like? Marketing and public policy will play a significant role in shaping the future of research and debate in the evolving use of data in these exchanges.

Now What? Consider submitting a manuscript for inclusion in this Special Issue.

 

​Journal of Public Policy and Marketing Special Issue: Marketing and Public Policy in a Technology-Integrated Society

Manuscripts are being solicited for an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing around the integration of marketing, public policy, and technology. We seek to present a diverse set of perspectives in marketing and public policy that inform the present and future availability and use of data in an increasingly technology‑integrated interactive society.

Data Authenticity and Quality Drives Decision-­Making Value Information is at the heart of decision-­making by consumers, firms, and government. Its authenticity and value drives the effectiveness of thoughts, feelings, and actions. In a data-­driven, Internet of (every)Things, society there is an abundance of data easily accessible and people and “things” are increasingly interconnected. A critical challenge in this environment is assessing the quality of information (e.g., fact vs. opinion, real vs. fake) and avoiding what President Obama (November 7, 2016) called, “a dust cloud of nonsense.”

To address concerns, partnerships in the exchange of information are emerging. For example, in October 2016, Nielsen launched their Connected Partner Program, which makes its “Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) data publicly available on a large scale…to foster a collaborative and open approach to [systematic] data-­‐‑driven decision making.” These types of partnerships play a vital role in yielding data integrity. “Firms in the data-­‐‑driven marketing economy received a net $202 billion from providing individual-­‐‑level customer data to the nation’s producers and distributors of goods and services” (Deighton and Johnson, 2015). How will the availability, access to, and quality of information that is influenced by technology impact a variety of core marketing issues, such as the exchange of products, consumer well-­‐‑being, and the like? Marketing and public policy will play a significant role in shaping the future of research and debate in the evolving use of data in these exchanges.

The Central Role of Technology

Trustworthy information reduces friction in commerce. Marketers benefit in terms of revenues and profits, and consumers benefit in terms of satisfaction and problem solving. In an era of growing digital exchanges and online experiences, technology plays a  central role in facilitating exchanges of goods, services, and ideas among consumers and organizations. The abundance of data from and about consumers, organizations, and government combined with the increasing conversion of data through the use of algorithms and artificial intelligence, are challenging traditional roles of marketing and public policy.

This special issue seeks to define, discuss, and delineate the macro and micro perspectives of marketing and public policy in an increasingly data-­‐‑rich and technology-­‐‑integrated environment. The ease of data storage, dissemination, and access is associated with short-­‐‑term and long-­‐‑term issues of risk and security. Companies and government agencies are confronted with data-­‐‑driven strategies, data-­‐‑generated decisions and the automaticity of data transfers, while confronted with legal, regulatory, and ethical struggles to keep pace with the technological advances. The future of marketing and public policy can benefit from personalization in a technology-­‐‑integrated society, thus this issue seeks to include perspectives on capturing those benefits while addressing the global well-­‐‑being of consumers and organizations.

VARIOUS PERSPECTIVES AND TOPICS SUGGESTED:

(note that additional relevant topics will also be considered)
  • Marketing Perspective (ethics, insights, analytics, social media, SEO-­‐SEM, branding, algorithmic marketing, product issues, i.e. wearables)
  • Consumer Perspective (well-­‐being, access, discrimination, gender roles/biases, CRM)
  • Legal Perspectve (net neutrality, state v federal, industry training)
  • Public Policy/Regulatory Perspective (privacy, cybersecurity, FTC/FCC, education, public/private/intimate)
  • Supply Chain Perspective (competition, distribution, B2B/C2C/B2C/M2M, antitrust)
  • Information Technology Perspective (open APIs, net neutrality, product development, robotics, artificial intelligence)
  • International Perspective (global challenges, openness, regulation

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND INFORMATION:

Inquiries can be directed to the special issue co-­‐editors: Kristen Walker (kristen.walker@csun.edu), George Milne (milne@isenberg.umass.edu) and Bruce Weinberg (weinberg@isenberg.umass.edu).

Submissions should follow the manuscript format guidelines for the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing found at: https://www.ama.org/publications/JournalOfPublicPolicyAndMarketing/Pages/JPPMGuidelines.aspx

All manuscripts should be submitted through the JPP&M online submission system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ama_jppm

The submission window for manuscripts is March 1, 2018 through May 31, 2018

 


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Matt Weingarden, Curator
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